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From routine check-ups and specialized procedures to advanced treatment and critical care, we are committed to providing the very best care.

Planning

Nurturing Care for Every Patient

Stanford Children’s Health, is the only Bay Area health network dedicated exclusively to pediatrics and obstetrics—from pharmacies and imaging to all general services. That means whether you’re visiting us for a well check-up or specialty appointment, your child is in the best possible hands.

Our family-centered care approach means you are a part of your child’s care team. Together, we understand your child’s unique needs, and provide individualized care that nurtures their mind, body and spirit. And, we provide hugs and high fives as part of every treatment plan.

Award Winning Services

U.S. News & World Report ranked nine of our specialties as some of the best in the nation.

 

Find Your Perfect Fit

We know how important the relationship is between you, your child and your doctor. We’ve made it easy to find the right doctor for your family, in a location that’s convenient for you.

In addition to the Lucile Packard Children’s Hospital Stanford, our network includes specialty service clinics, joint venture partnerships with Sutter Health California Pacific Medical Center and John Muir Health, and many satellite hospital locations throughout Northern California.

We Value Your Insight

You’re the expert on your child, and you have valuable information and insights that can help us provide the best possible care. To prepare for your visit, please write down your insights and share them with your doctor. Bring all of your questions, too. When it comes to the health and well-being of your child, there’s no such thing as too many questions.

Immune Compromised Patients

During our construction, please take extra care when your child is coming and going from the hospital or clinics on Welch Road.

Read the guidelines

Doctor & Clinic Visits

Making Your Visit the Best it Can Be

A visit to the doctor can make some kids uneasy. Here are a few tips to make your visit easier for your child, and you.

  • Kids often fear the unknown. Talk through what to expect. With younger children, read a book about visiting the doctor. Role-play a clinic visit, using a stuffed animal or doll to demonstrate an exam.
  • Some kids fear separation. Reassure your child that you’ll be with them the entire time.
  • Discuss something fun you’ll do after your visit.
  • Build in extra travel time so that you’re not rushed. Our waiting rooms are designed to keep kids occupied and happy.
  • Allow your child to wear their favorite outfit, superhero costume or tiara.
  • Bring along a favorite toy.

Help Whenever You Need It

We know accidents don't always happen from 9-5. The After Hours Clinic is here to help.

A Little Preparation Goes a Long Way

When you arrive at one of our admitting or clinic check-in areas, you’ll be greeted by a Stanford Children’s Health staff member. Please bring the following:

  • Valid photo identification
  • Insurance information and a photocopy of your/your child’s insurance card(s)
  • Names, addresses and phone numbers of the doctor(s) who referred you to Lucile Packard Children’s Hospital Stanford and/or provides care for you or your child
  • List of your child’s medications
  • Any orders or paperwork you may have received from a health care provider
  • If you would like to authorize a family member or friend to bring your child to their appointment, please complete this form and have it available at the appointment (English/Spanish).


Patient & Family Resources

We're here to help. We have many resources, from how to pay your bill to safety tips for your visit.

 

 

 



Hospital and Procedure Visits

We are here to help

We understand that kids and their parents may come with concerns about their hospital stay. We’re here to understand your needs and theirs, and support you every step of the way. With our inclusive, family-centered approach to care, you are an important part of the team, along with our top doctors and exceptional nurses and staff.

Important Safety Instructions

Visiting Hours & Information

If you think your child may need a procedure or surgery, click here to find a provider.

Preparing for Your Child's Procedure

The Procedural or Surgical Clinic Appointment

During a clinic appointment, your child’s provider will tell you about the procedure and give you important information about what to expect while your child is being cared for at Lucile Packard Children’s Hospital Stanford. The provider may order tests or lab work to be done before the procedure or surgery. You will also get instructions about:

  1. Registration
  2. The Pediatric Anesthesia Resource Center (PARC).
  3. Your child’s comfort plan

This clinic appointment is a great chance to ask any questions you may have about the procedure or the care your child will receive afterwards to recover.

Registration for Procedure or Surgery

Before a procedure or surgery, you will need to register your child with our hospital. You will get instructions about registration when you schedule your child’s procedure or surgery.

To save time on the day of surgery, many parents prefer to pre-register. To pre-register by phone, call (650) 497-8229. This service is available 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. You will need to have your child’s insurance information available.

The Pre-Operative Anesthesia Phone Appointment

A short time before your child’s procedure or surgery, you will likely have a phone appointment with the ‘Pediatric Anesthesia Resource Center’ (PARC). PARC is the pre-operative anesthesia clinic. Anesthesia is the medicine used to drift your child to sleep during a procedure or surgery. The surgical clinic scheduler or PARC medical assistant will help you schedule your PARC phone appointment. The scheduler or PARC medical assistant will let you know if your child’s medical history requires an in person appointment with PARC.

PARC appointments usually last about 30-45 minutes. This phone call or clinic appointment is a critical safety step before your child’s procedure or surgery.

PARC will review with you:

  • Your child’s medical history and current medical care.
  • Your child’s past medical experiences.
  • Your child’s developmental history and any special considerations.
  • Care instructions you must follow before the procedure or surgery.
  • When and where to bring your child for the procedure or surgery.
  • The preliminary comfort plan.  If your child has a particular toy, blanket, or other object that helps him/her feel better in uncomfortable situations, let us know.

PARC will give you information about:

  • The anesthesia (medicine to drift your child to sleep during the procedure or surgery).
  • Pain management (ways we can help your child be comfortable afterwards).
  • What to do if you have questions or problems before, during or after the procedure or surgery.

Please contact the Pediatric Anesthesia Resource Center (PARC), at (650) 736-7359 with any questions you have.

Learn about Ford Family Surgery Center

Most procedures or surgeries are done in the Ford Family Surgery Center on the ground floor of Lucile Packard Children's Hospital Stanford.

The Ford Family Surgery Center at Lucile Packard Children’s Hospital Stanford is a state-of-the-art surgical facility designed specifically for children. To learn more, click here:

Important Safety Instructions to Follow

Stop Food and Drink Before Your Child’s Procedure or Surgery

Your child must stop eating and drinking before undergoing anesthesia for a procedure or surgery. There are life threatening safety risks of undergoing anesthesia with food and drink in the stomach.  It is critical for your child’s stomach to be empty before the procedure or surgery.

You will be given instructions about stopping your child’s food and drink before the procedure or surgery. This time of no eating and drinking is called “NPO.” The amount of time your child needs to stop eating and drinking before anesthesia depends on his/her age.  These instructions are for your child’s safety during the procedure or surgery.

The Pediatric Anesthesia Resource Center (PARC) will go over these instructions with you. Please ask any questions you have about following these important safety instructions. On the night before the procedure or surgery, follow the instructions from PARC exactly.

Generally the NPO (no eating or drinking) instructions are listed below. To keep your child as safe as possible, if these guidelines are not followed, your child’s procedure or surgery may be delayed or cancelled.  A small number of children will receive special guidelines that differ from these. Follow the directions provided by your healthcare provider.

  1. Stop solid food, candy, and juice (except clear apple juice) at midnight.
  2. Stop formula and milk 6 hours before the procedure.
  3. Stop breast milk 4 hours before the procedure. 
  4. Stop all clear liquids 3 hours before the procedure.   

Clear liquids include only water, clear apple juice (no pulp, no apple cider), pedialyte, and Gatorade.

Bathe or Shower Before the Procedure or Surgery

To help lower the risk of your child getting an infection during the procedure or surgery, your child will need to bathe or shower the night before unless otherwise directed by your healthcare provider.

  • For babies and children younger than 12 months of age:
    Use a regular baby soap that you would normally use on your child.
  • For children older than 12 months of age:
    Use any regular antibacterial soap the night before. 

If you were given CHG wipes at your surgical clinic appointment, use these after bathing as directed.

PARC can answer any questions you have about bathing before the procedure or surgery.

Ask About Giving Medicine Before the Procedure or Surgery

If your child is currently taking medicine, ask for instructions from the PARC anesthesia provider. Find out if your child should continue the regular medicines before the procedure or surgery. Also ask about whether or not your child may have over-the-counter medicines before the procedure or surgery. Follow the instructions from PARC exactly.

Let Us Know Any Signs of Illness Before the Procedure or Surgery

If your child is feeling sick (for example, fever, cough, rash, diarrhea, etc.) before the procedure or surgery, please call the Pediatric Anesthesia Resource Center (PARC) at (650) 736-7359 from 9am to 5pm Monday through Friday. Call the operating room front desk at (650) 721-2820 from 5PM to 9AM and on weekends.

If parents have signs of illness before your child’s procedure or surgery, please arrange for another legal guardian to bring your child to the hospital. Call the Pediatric Anesthesia Resource Center (PARC) at (650) 736-7359 from 9am to 5 pm or the operating room front desk at (650) 721-2820 from 5pm to 9am if you need assistance.

To protect our patients from infection, parents, visitors, and staff with illness or exposure to contagious diseases are not permitted into the hospital.

Planning for Your Child’s Comfort

What You Can Expect

Some discomfort and pain after your child’s procedure or surgery is expected.  However there are many ways we can make your child comfortable. The amount of pain your child may have depends on his/her condition and procedure. It may not be possible to get rid of all of the pain but we will create a plan to control the pain and keep the pain level as low as possible. Controlling pain is an important part of recovering from a procedure or surgery.

Planning for your Child’s Comfort: Before the Procedure or Surgery

Some pain or discomfort after a procedure or surgery is normal.  For some parents, knowing what to expect can make things easier for you and your child.

We are committed to taking care of your child’s pain and working with you to make your child as comfortable as possible.

At your child’s clinic appointment, your care provider will discuss the details of your child’s procedure or surgery. They will help you know more about what to expect regarding pain and options for relieving pain after the procedure or surgery. The provider will discuss your child’s need for pain medication and other non-medication options that help relieve pain.

This appointment is a good time for you to partner with the provider about the plan for your child’s pain control. You know your child best and can share what you know works to keep your child comfortable.

Also, your child may feel nervous about the upcoming surgery or procedure.  This is completely normal. To help with this, we have Child Life Specialists available to work with your child before their procedure, on the procedure date, and after the procedure.

Your phone appointment with the Pediatric Anesthesia Resource Center (PARC) will prepare you and your child for the day of surgery. Parents can take this opportunity to ask any questions and discuss your child’s comfort plan.

Questions to ask your surgical and anesthesia provider:

  • How much pain is expected?
  • How long will the pain last?
  • What are the options for pain relief after the procedure or surgery?
  • What can I do to help my child prepare for his or her recovery from this procedure?
  • Can I make a Child Life referral to assist with my child’s anxiety and concerns?

Click here to print out these important safety guidelines.

Child and Family Life Services

Child Life Specialists are trained professionals who provide pediatric patients developmentally appropriate preparation and support for surgeries and procedures. Specialists also work with children and families to develop coping plans to reduce anxiety and provide opportunities for play and self expression.

If you feel like your child would benefit from Child Life Services, call (650) 497-8336 or click here.

Pediatric Pain Management Team

The pediatric pain specialists are providers who specialize in pain management for children. Your child’s surgical team may ask the Pain Team to help with the plan for managing your child’s pain after surgery.  This team provides pain control and symptom management in a variety ways.

In addition to surgical patients, they provide expert consultation for hospitalized patients who are experiencing pain for other reasons including:

  • Pain due to an injury 
  • Pain caused by an illness (cancer, sickle cell anemia, etc.)
  • Pain from a treatment for an illness (chemotherapy, radiation, etc.)
  • Nausea or other unpleasant symptoms or side effects that persist (itching, etc.)

For further information about the Pain Management Team, click here.

What to Bring With You:

Arriving prepared can make things go smoothly for you and your child on the day of your procedure or surgery. Some things you may need are listed below. Don’t forget items that will help you and your child feel relaxed and comfortable during your stay.

What to Bring: Checklist for Parents:

  • Valid photo identification
  • Insurance information and your/your child’s insurance card(s)
  • List of your child’s medications and doses
  • Any orders or paperwork you may have received from a health care provider
  • Your list of questions about the procedure or surgery
  • Home medications for before or after the procedure
  • If you would like to authorize a family member or friend to bring your child to their appointment, please complete this form and bring it with you.

What to Bring: Checklist for Children

  • A book or toy to play with
  • A music or game player and headphones
  • A favorite pillow, blanket, or stuffed animal

Arriving at the Hospital:

Lucile Packard Children’s Hospital Stanford is located at:
725 Welch Road Palo Alto, CA 94304 (650) 497-8000

You are most welcome to use the free valet parking service and let the attendant park for you.  The valet attendants are located at the top of the driveway at the main entrance to Lucile Packard Children’s Hospital Stanford.

We want your child’s hospital experience to be as smooth and comfortable as possible.  Please read our Admission Procedures to know more about arriving at the hospital.

Checking in for Your Child’s Procedure or Surgery

  • If your child is having surgery, get a visitor’s badge at the hospital’s main entrance and go directly to the Ford Family Surgery Center on the Ground floor of the hospital. You do not need to stop in the hospital admitting office.
  • If your child is having a radiology procedure like a MRI, get a visitor’s badge at the hospital’s main entrance and go directly to the Radiology Department. You do not need to stop in the hospital admitting office.
  • If your child is having any of the following, get a visitor’s badge at the hospital’s main entrance and go to the patient admitting office, just to the right of the main entrance.
  • Pregnant women coming to deliver a baby should go to Labor and Delivery on the 2nd floor. Please complete the check-in process prior to delivery.

Changes, Delays or Cancellation of Procedures or Surgeries

Procedures or surgeries may be cancelled and rescheduled for a variety of reasons.

Unfortunately, there are some times when procedures or surgeries may be cancelled or rescheduled. We know this may be disappointing or frustrating to you and your child. The two things parents can do to lower the chance of the procedure or surgery schedule changes is to:

  1. Follow the no eating and drinking instructions to ensure your child has an empty stomach
  2. Arrive on time.

If Your Child’s Stomach is Not Empty Before Anesthesia

For your child’s safety, the procedure or surgery may be cancelled or rescheduled if your child has not stopped food and drink as instructed before surgery.

Your child must stop eating and drinking before undergoing anesthesia for a procedure or surgery. There are life threatening safety risks of undergoing anesthesia with food and drink in the stomach. It is critical for your child’s stomach to be empty before the procedure or surgery.

On the night before the procedure or surgery, you must follow the instructions about stopping your child’s food and drink before the procedure or surgery exactly as PARC has instructed you. These instructions are for your child’s safety during the procedure or surgery.

Please ask any questions you have about following these important safety instructions.

General NPO (no eating or drinking) instructions are listed below. A small number of children will receive special guidelines that differ from these.  Follow the directions provided by your healthcare provider.

  1. Stop solid food, candy, and juice (except clear apple juice) at midnight.
  2. Stop formula and milk 6 hours before the procedure.
  3. Stop breast milk 4 hours before the procedure. 
  4. Stop all clear liquids 3 hours before the procedure.   

Clear liquids include only water, clear apple juice (no pulp, no apple cider), pedialyte, and Gatorade.

If Your Child Arrives Late for the Procedure or Surgery

It is critical that you arrive on time with your child. We are working to reduce wait times and stay on schedule, so we may have to cancel/reschedule your child’s procedure if you arrive late.   Please allow an extra 15-30 minutes to park and walk to the Ford Family Surgery Center. You are most welcome to use the free valet parking service and let the attendant park for you. The valet attendants are located at the top of the driveway at the main entrance to Lucile Packard Children’s Hospital Stanford.

During the scheduling of your child’s procedure you will be told the time of arrival for your child’s procedure or surgery. If you know you will have difficulty arriving on time or do not remember your arrival time, please call the Pediatric Anesthesia Resource Center (PARC) at (650) 736-7359 from 9am to 5pm or the operating room front desk at (650) 721-2820 from 5pm to 9am.

Unexpected Schedule Changes

On few occasions, we may have to reschedule or delay your child’s procedure due to unexpected or emergency surgeries. We sincerely apologize if this happens and, we will try to keep you informed of the reasons for the delay or reschedule your child’s procedure or surgery as soon as possible.

What to bring to the Hospital

Arriving prepared can make things go smoothly for you and your child on the day of your procedure or surgery.  Some things you may need are listed below.  Don’t forget items that will help you and your child feel relaxed and comfortable during your stay. In order to decrease the risk of spreading illnesses, please try to arrange childcare for siblings.

What to Bring: Checklist for Parents:

  • Valid photo identification
  • Insurance information and your/your child’s insurance card(s)
  • List of your child’s medications
  • Any orders or paperwork you may have received from a health care provider
  • Your list of questions about the procedure or surgery
  • Home medications for before or after the procedure
  • If you would like to authorize a family member or friend to bring your child to their appointment, please complete this form and bring it with you.

What to Bring: Checklist for Children

  • A book or toy to play with
  • A music or game player and headphones
  • A favorite pillow, blanket, or stuffed animal

Planning for Your Child’s Comfort

What You Can Expect

We know that on the day of the procedure or surgery, your child may be hungry or anxious. You know best how to comfort him/her.  Please let us know if you have ideas or need our help keeping your child comfortable on the day of his/her procedure or surgery.

Planning for your Child’s Comfort: The Day of the Procedure or Surgery

You are here today for your child’s procedure. No one knows your child as well as you, and we would love to learn more about what you think will help your child cope with this experience. If your child has a particular toy, blanket, or other object that helps him/her feel better in uncomfortable situations, let us know!

You will soon meet your pediatric anesthesia team. The anesthesia team will review with you the plan for pain control during the procedure in the operating room and immediately afterward while in the recovery room. Some pain or discomfort is expected after a procedure or surgery. If you have any questions or concerns about your child’s pain control plan, please talk with us about it.  It is important to us that you understand and feel comfortable with the plan.

Some children may have an IV placed prior to going to sleep.  Your anesthesiologist will explain why this may be necessary and can explain different options to help control the discomfort of having an IV placed.

Questions to ask your pediatric anesthesiologist today include:

  • What type of medicine will you use to control my child’s pain today?
  • Are there other ways to control pain besides medicine by mouth or through an IV (such as a regional block, caudal, or epidural)?
  • What are the risks of anesthesia?
  • Can I stay with my child until he/she goes to sleep?
  • How much pain will my child have when he/she wakes up?

Click here to print out these important safety guidelines.

Meet Your Care Team

Once you arrive and check in, you and your child will soon meet many members of the team dedicated to caring for your child.

Pediatric Anesthesia team

This team will make sure your child receives the safest anesthesia (medicine to drift your child to sleep) and is monitored carefully during the procedure. The Anesthesia team is led by an attending physician and includes students, Residents (doctors at different levels of training), Fellows and Anesthesia Nurse Practitioners.

Surgical Team

Just before your procedure, you may have a chance to talk briefly with a member of the surgical team. Your child’s surgeon will meet with you afterwards to update you about the surgery.

Nurses

Nurses in the Ford Family Surgery Center take care of your child each step of the way.  They can answer any questions and help you and your child feel comfortable. Our nurses include: pre-operative care (before surgery), operating room care (during surgery), and post-operative care (after surgery).

Child Life Specialists

Child Life Specialists can help prepare your child for the procedure or surgery. They also teach children and parents ways to stay calm and relaxed before the surgery. Just ask any member of our care team if you or your child would like to meet with a Child Life Specialist.

Other Team Members

Our team of medical assistants, patient navigators, and volunteers are available to provide additional support while you are here for your child’s procedure or surgery. Please let us know if we can help you in any way.

To learn more about the role of fellows, residents, and medical students in your child’s care, click here.

How are we doing?

If you have comments, questions or concerns about your child’s care or a compliment to share, please talk to your nurse, physician or the manager of your hospital unit or complete our online form. You may also reach out to a social worker or chaplain, or contact Patient Relations at (650) 498-4847.

 

 

Recovering in the Hospital After your Procedure or Surgery

Immediately after the procedure or surgery, your child will receive care in the post anesthetic care unit (PACU) or in one of our intensive care units (ICUs).

Some children will go home after recovering in the PACU, while others will be admitted to an acute care unit in the hospital to continue recovering.

If your child is admitted to the hospital, you will meet your care team who will make sure you have all the information you need to make informed decisions. Every morning, during Family-Centered Rounds, your child’s care team—doctors, nurses, staff and you—will meet to discuss your child’s care plan. You are encouraged to attend these rounds.

Whether you’re here for a few days or several months, we have many resources available for you and your child to help you feel comfortable during your stay.

Planning for Your Child’s Comfort

What You Can Expect

During recovery, your child may have some pain or discomfort.  We have a plan in place to keep your child’s pain as low as possible.  Please let us know if you have questions or concerns about your child’s level of pain.

Planning for your Child’s Comfort: During Recovery

Helping your child feel as comfortable as possible is one of our top priorities.

  • Comfort Plan
    While your child is here for a procedure or surgery, we will follow a personalized Comfort Care Plan. The Comfort Plan lists things that make your child the most comfortable. Ask your nurse to fill out the Comfort Plan with you.
  • Assessing Pain
    The team will assess (check on) your child’s pain in several ways:
    • Children who can talk may be able to tell us where and how much it hurts.
    • Your child’s heart rate and breathing can tell us about his/her level of pain.
    • Your child’s behavior may change and alert us to pain or discomfort he/she may have.
    Ask your nurse about which pain scale is being used to check on your child’s pain.
  • Treating Pain
    In addition to medicine, the team may use other ways to make your child more comfortable:
    • Physical or occupational therapy
    • Child life specialists
    • Complementary therapies like massage
    • Consultation with the Pediatric Pain Service
  • Pediatric Pain Management Team
    The pediatric pain specialists are providers who specialize in pain management for children.  Your child’s surgical team may ask the Pediatric Pain Management Team to help with the plan for managing your child’s pain after surgery. This team provides pain control and symptom management in a variety ways.
  • Questions to ask your healthcare team:
    • Why might you limit the amount of pain medicine my child can have?
    • How can you tell if my child has too little or too much pain medicine?
    • How long will the pain last?
    • What other ways can you help my child manage the pain besides medicine?

Click here to print out these important safety guidelines.

Child Life & Recreation Therapy

With activities like pet assisted therapy and tailored surgery prep, our Child Life specialists strive to reduce stress and embrace the value of play as an important part of healing.

 

Pain Management

 

About Your Visit

Going Home after Your Visit or Procedure

When your child is discharged from the hospital, we expect to make your return home as easy as possible. Before you leave the hospital, be sure the nurse has given you phone numbers to call if you have questions or concerns once you are home.

  • The team will make sure you have the prescriptions.
  • The team will also give you discharge instructions for care at home.
  • You will receive information about when your child can resume normal activities such as returning to school.

Planning for Your Child’s Comfort

What You Can Expect

As your child continues recovery at home, you will follow the pain management plan to keep your child’s pain as low as possible. If you have questions or concerns about your child’s pain, use the phone number given to you by your nurse at the time of discharge to reach a provider.

Planning for your Child’s Comfort: Going Home

Your child’s recovery continues at home after you leave us. We want to make sure your child is safe and comfortable during this recovery period.

Your surgeon may order medicine for your child to take at home to help control his/her pain until fully healed.

Before leaving the hospital, we want to be sure you understand the plan for pain control.

The nurse or physician will review the medicine for pain control before you leave the hospital to go home (prior to discharge).

Questions to ask about care at home

  • Where will I pick up prescriptions?
  • When do I start this prescription?
  • Who will I call if I am concerned about my child’s pain once we are home?
  • How long can we expect this pain to last?
  • How long should my child take the medicine for pain?

Click here to print out these important safety guidelines.

Emergencies

24-Hours a Day, 7 Days a Week

We’re here for you in an emergency. Our pediatric emergency department team is made up of world-class Stanford Medicine doctors and outstanding 100-percent registered nurses. We know kids, and have designed our emergency department with them in mind—including our waiting room stocked with toys and games, and TVs and iPads in every room. Patient rooms are equipped with monitors linked to our central nursing station, which allows for constant eyes and ears on your child.

Quick Reference

Download our fact sheet with phone numbers and a map of the Pediatric Emergency Department.