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Emily Kraus, MD

  • Emily Ann Kraus

I love helping injured young athletes get back to the activities and sports they love, and I enjoy working with players, coaches and trainers to prevent sports injuries before they happen. I work with a multidisciplinary team that includes orthopedic surgeons, athletic trainers, physical therapists and more to provide my patients with seamless, connected care.

I’ve had the good fortune of finding a job that allows me to not just manage sports injuries but truly treat the entire athlete. In sports medicine, it’s essential that we think about every aspect of healing and injury prevention, including nutrition, stress, training and sports psychology. When an athlete walks into my clinic, he or she will be welcomed with a smile, treated with respect and given the most individualized care I can provide. I embrace questions and interactive visits!

I especially enjoy those moments when I see the fire return to the eyes of an athlete who’s recovering from injury. That’s when I know the athlete gets it and is committed to the treatment plan.

Specialties

Orthopedics

Sports Medicine

Work and Education

Professional Education

University of Nebraska College of Medicine, Omaha, NE, 05/12/2012

Internship

University of Nebraska Medical Center Internal Medicine Residency, Omaha, NE, 06/30/2013

Residency

Stanford University Physical Medicine and Rehabiliation, Redwood City, CA, 06/30/2016

Fellowship

Stanford University Sports Physical Med and Rehab Fellowship, Redwood City, CA, 07/31/2017

Conditions Treated

ACL Tears

Bone health

Broken bones

Concussions

Cycling

Fractures

Injury prevention

Running

Sports injuries

Torn ligaments

All Publications

Integrating Musculoskeletal Education and Patient Care at MedicalStudent-Run Free Clinics. PM & R : the journal of injury, function, and rehabilitation McQuillan, T., Wilcox-Fogel, N., Kraus, E., Ladd, A., Fredericson, M. 2017

Abstract

Student-run free clinics (SRFCs) have emerged as an important educational component of United States (US) medical schools. Despite the prevalence of musculoskeletal (MSK) problems presenting to SRFCs, students and clinics are often unprepared to diagnose and to treat common MSK complaints.We sought to determine the scope of diagnosis and treatment at a medical student-run free clinic specializing in musculoskeletal care using physical medicine and rehabilitation (PM&R) residents. Secondary goals included reviewing student satisfaction and determining the appropriateness of the clinic in medical education.Retrospective chart review, anonymous online survey.Primary care, free student clinic affiliated with tertiary academic medical center.A total of 20 medical student volunteers, 6 PM&R residents, and 91 community patients.We established a musculoskeletal clinic as a specialty referral clinic for the 2 primary care SRFCs with institutional support from a partner medical school. We then reviewed clinical operations retrospectively using electronic medical records and student satisfaction based on an online survey.We analyzed patient demographics and chief complaints, referrals provided, and medical services rendered. We also used a 5-point Likert scale to assess student satisfaction.A monthly musculoskeletal referral clinic was established with the oversight of PM&R attendings and residents. The clinic received 91 referrals and managed 61 unique patients over a 2.5-year study period. The most common presentations to the clinic involved knee pain (n = 17, 27.9%) and back pain (n = 16, 26.2%). Pro bono relationships with community and institutional partners enabled all patients to receive medical examinations, physical therapy visits, plain film radiographs, and insurance consultations free of charge. Student satisfaction with teaching and patient care was high, with 19 of 20 students reporting their experience as "good" or "excellent."SRFCs represent an underused opportunity to enhance MSK education among medical students by treating a variety of common MSK complaints in an underserved population.To be determined.

View details for DOI 10.1016/j.pmrj.2017.03.008

View details for PubMedID 28389399

Poster 155 Higher Cumulative Risk Assessment Scores Are Associated with Delayed Return to Play in Division I Collegiate Distance Runners. PM & R : the journal of injury, function, and rehabilitation Kraus, E. A., Kim, B., Nattiv, A., Tenforde, A., Barrack, M., Deakins-Roche, M., Kussman, A., Singh, S., Morkos, J., Fredericson, M. 2016; 8 (9S): S212-S213

View details for DOI 10.1016/j.pmrj.2016.07.196

View details for PubMedID 27672919

Piriformis Syndrome With Variant Sciatic Nerve Anatomy:ACaseReport. PM & R : the journal of injury, function, and rehabilitation Kraus, E., Tenforde, A. S., Beaulieu, C. F., Ratliff, J., Fredericson, M. 2016; 8 (2): 176-179

Abstract

A 68-year-old male long distance runner presented with low back and left buttock pain, which eventually progressed to severe and debilitating pain, intermittently radiating to the posterior thigh and foot. A comprehensive workup ruled out possible spine or hip causes of his symptoms. A pelvic magnetic resonance imaging neurogram with complex oblique planes through the piriformis demonstrated variant anatomy of the left sciatic nerve consistent with the clinical diagnosis of piriformis syndrome. The patient ultimately underwent neurolysis with release of the sciatic nerve and partial resection of the piriformis muscle. After surgery the patient reported significant pain reduction and resumed running 3 months later. Piriformis syndrome is uncommon but should be considered in the differential diagnosis for buttock pain. Advanced imaging was essential to guide management.

View details for DOI 10.1016/j.pmrj.2015.09.005

View details for PubMedID 26377629

Bone Stress Injuries in Runners. Physical medicine and rehabilitation clinics of North America Tenforde, A. S., Kraus, E., Fredericson, M. 2016; 27 (1): 139-149

Abstract

Bone stress injuries (BSIs) are common running injuries and may occur at a rate of 20% annually. Both biological and biomechanical risk factors contribute to BSI. Evaluation of a runner with suspected BSI includes completing an appropriate history and physical examination. MRI grading classification for BSI has been proposed and may guide return to play. Management includes activity modification, optimizing nutrition, and addressing risk factors, including the female athlete triad. BSI prevention strategies include screening for risk factors during preparticipation evaluations, optimizing nutrition (including adequate caloric intake, calcium, and vitamin D), and promoting ball sports during childhood and adolescence.

View details for DOI 10.1016/j.pmr.2015.08.008

View details for PubMedID 26616181