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Janene Fuerch, MD

  • Janene Hilary Fuerch

Specialties

Neonatology

Work and Education

Professional Education

State University of New York at Buffalo School of Medicine, Buffalo, NY, 6/1/2010

Residency

Lucile Packard Children's Hospital, Palo Alto, CA, 6/30/2013

Fellowship

Lucile Packard Children's Hospital at Stanford University Medical Center, Palo Alto, CA, 6/30/2016

Board Certifications

Pediatrics, American Board of Pediatrics

All Publications

Impact of a novel decision support tool on adherence to Neonatal Resuscitation Program algorithm RESUSCITATION Fuerch, J. H., Yamada, N. K., Coelho, P. R., Lee, H. C., Halamek, L. P. 2015; 88: 52-56

Abstract

Studies have shown that healthcare professionals (HCPs) display a 16-55% error rate in adherence to the Neonatal Resuscitation Program (NRP) algorithm. The aim of this study was to evaluate adherence to the Neonatal Resuscitation Program algorithm by subjects working from memory as compared to subjects using a decision support tool that provides auditory and visual prompts to guide implementation of the Neonatal Resuscitation Program algorithm during simulated neonatal resuscitation.Healthcare professionals (physicians, nurse practitioners, obstetrical/neonatal nurses) with a current NRP card were randomized to the control or intervention group and performed three simulated neonatal resuscitations. The scenarios were evaluated for the initiation and cessation of positive pressure ventilation (PPV) and chest compressions (CC), as well as the frequency of FiO2 adjustment. The Wilcoxon rank sum test was used to compare a score measuring the adherence of the control and intervention groups to the Neonatal Resuscitation Program algorithm.Sixty-five healthcare professionals were recruited and randomized to the control or intervention group. Positive pressure ventilation was performed correctly 55-80% of the time in the control group vs. 94-95% in the intervention group across all three scenarios (p<0.0001). Chest compressions were performed correctly 71-81% of the time in the control group vs. 82-93% in the intervention group in the two scenarios in which they were indicated (p<0.0001). FiO2 was addressed three times more frequently in the intervention group compared to the control group (p<0.001).Healthcare professionals using a decision support tool exhibit significantly fewer deviations from the Neonatal Resuscitation Program algorithm compared to those working from memory alone during simulated neonatal resuscitation.

View details for DOI 10.1016/j.resuscitation.2014.12.016

View details for Web of Science ID 000352508400023

View details for PubMedID 25555358

The Neonatal Resuscitation Program: Current Recommendations and a Look at the Future INDIAN JOURNAL OF PEDIATRICS Kumar, P., Yamada, N. K., Fuerch, J. H., Halamek, L. P. 2014; 81 (5): 473-480

Abstract

The Neonatal Resuscitation Program (NRP) consists of an algorithm and curriculum to train healthcare professionals to facilitate newborn infants' transition to extrauterine life and to provide a standardized approach to the care of infants who require more invasive support and resuscitation. This review discusses the most recent update of the NRP algorithm and recommended guidelines for the care of newly born infants. Current challenges in training and assessment as well as the importance of ergonomics in the optimization of human performance are discussed. Finally, it is recommended that in order to ensure high-performing resuscitation teams, members should be selected and retained based on objective performance criteria and frequent participation in realistic simulated clinical scenarios.

View details for DOI 10.1007/s12098-013-1332-0

View details for Web of Science ID 000335739000011

View details for PubMedID 24652267

A randomized trial of the effects of reducing television viewing and computer use on body mass index in young children ARCHIVES OF PEDIATRICS & ADOLESCENT MEDICINE Epstein, L. H., Roemmich, J. N., Robinson, J. L., Paluch, R. A., Winiewicz, D. D., Fuerch, J. H., Robinson, T. N. 2008; 162 (3): 239-245

Abstract

To assess the effects of reducing television viewing and computer use on children's body mass index (BMI) as a risk factor for the development of overweight in young children.Randomized controlled clinical trial.University children's hospital.Seventy children aged 4 to 7 years whose BMI was at or above the 75th BMI percentile for age and sex.Children were randomized to an intervention to reduce their television viewing and computer use by 50% vs a monitoring control group that did not reduce television viewing or computer use.Age- and sex-standardized BMI (zBMI), television viewing, energy intake, and physical activity were monitored every 6 months during 2 years.Children randomized to the intervention group showed greater reductions in targeted sedentary behavior (P < .001), zBMI (P < .05), and energy intake (P < .05) compared with the monitoring control group. Socioeconomic status moderated zBMI change (P = .01), with the experimental intervention working better among families of low socioeconomic status. Changes in targeted sedentary behavior mediated changes in zBMI (P < .05). The change in television viewing was related to the change in energy intake (P < .001) but not to the change in physical activity (P =.37).Reducing television viewing and computer use may have an important role in preventing obesity and in lowering BMI in young children, and these changes may be related more to changes in energy intake than to changes in physical activity.

View details for Web of Science ID 000253672100007

View details for PubMedID 18316661

View details for PubMedCentralID PMC2291289