nutch_noindex
CANCEL
/nutch_noindex

Julie Good, MD

  • No Image

Work and Education

Professional Education

University of Minnesota School of Medicine, Minneapolis, MN, 1996

Residency

Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA, 1999

Fellowship

Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA, 2000

Board Certifications

Hospice & Palliative Medicine, American Board of Pediatrics

Pediatrics, American Board of Pediatrics

Conditions Treated

Pain Management

Palliative Care

All Publications

Pain care for patients with epidermolysis bullosa: best care practice guidelines BMC MEDICINE Goldschneider, K. R., Good, J., Harrop, E., Liossi, C., Lynch-Jordan, A., Martinez, A. E., Maxwell, L. G., Stanko-Lopp, D. 2014; 12
Pain care for patients with epidermolysis bullosa: best care practice guidelines. BMC medicine Goldschneider, K. R., Good, J., Harrop, E., Liossi, C., Lynch-Jordan, A., Martinez, A. E., Maxwell, L. G., Stanko-Lopp, D. 2014; 12: 178-?

Abstract

Inherited epidermolysis bullosa (EB) comprises a group of rare disorders that have multi-system effects and patients present with a number of both acute and chronic pain care needs. Effects on quality of life are substantial. Pain and itching are burdensome daily problems. Experience with, and knowledge of, the best pain and itch care for these patients is minimal. Evidence-based best care practice guidelines are needed to establish a base of knowledge and practice for practitioners of many disciplines to improve the quality of life for both adult and pediatric patients with EB.The process was begun at the request of Dystrophic Epidermolysis Bullosa Research Association International (DEBRA International), an organization dedicated to improvement of care, research and dissemination of knowledge for EB patients worldwide. An international panel of experts in pain and palliative care who have extensive experience caring for patients with EB was assembled. Literature was reviewed and systematically evaluated. For areas of care without direct evidence, clinically relevant literature was assessed, and rounds of consensus building were conducted. The process involved a face-to-face consensus meeting that involved a family representative and methodologist, as well as the panel of clinical experts. During development, EB family input was obtained and the document was reviewed by a wide variety of experts representing several disciplines related to the care of patients with EB.The first evidence-based care guidelines for the care of pain in EB were produced. The guidelines are clinically relevant for care of patients of all subtypes and ages, and apply to practitioners of all disciplines involved in the care of patients with EB. When the evidence suggests that the diagnosis or treatment of painful conditions differs between adults and children, it will be so noted.Evidence-based care guidelines are a means of standardizing optimal care for EB patients, whose disease is often times horrific in its effects on quality of life, and whose care is resource-intensive and difficult. The guideline development process also highlighted areas for research in order to improve further the evidence base for future care.

View details for DOI 10.1186/s12916-014-0178-2

View details for PubMedID 25603875

The Stanford Arts and Anesthesia Soiree: Performing to create community and understand anesthesiology Creative Arts in Humane Medicine Ed. McLean CL Chen, C., Hasan, N., Good, J., Shafer, A. Brush Education Inc.. 2014: pp. 76-81
Psychiatric medications for the treatment of pruritus PSYCHOSOMATIC MEDICINE Shaw, R. J., Dayal, S., Good, J., Bruckner, A. L., Joshi, S. V. 2007; 69 (9): 970-978

Abstract

To review the use of psychiatric medications in the treatment of pruritus.A literature review was conducted using the key words pruritus, psychiatric, and treatment.Three categories of pruritus are described: dermatologic, systemic, and psychogenic. Peripheral and central nervous system mechanisms of pruritus are reviewed. Conventional dermatologic treatments for pruritus are contrasted with some of the common psychopharmacologic treatment modalities that include anxiolytic, antidepressant, and antipsychotic agents. A treatment algorithm is offered to help guide the treatment of patients with pruritus.Psychiatric medications have been used successfully in the treatment of pruritus that is associated with both psychocutaneous and systemic disorders, which are resistant to conventional treatment.

View details for DOI 10.1097/PSY.0b013e3181572799

View details for Web of Science ID 000251204900024

View details for PubMedID 17991825

Improved pain management in pediatric postoperative liver transplant patients using parental education and non-pharmacologic interventions PEDIATRIC TRANSPLANTATION Sharek, P. J., Wayman, K., Lin, E., Strichartz, D., Sentivany-Collins, S., Good, J., Esquivel, C., Brown, M., Cox, K. 2006; 10 (2): 172-177

Abstract

A pain management intervention, consisting of pretransplant parental education and support, pre- and postoperative behavioral pediatrics consultation, postoperative physical and occupational therapy consultation, and implementation of non-pharmacologic pain management strategies, was introduced to all pediatrics patients receiving liver transplants at Lucile Packard Children's Hospital beginning August 2001. Children receiving transplants pre-intervention (May, 2000 to February, 2001) and post-intervention (August, 2001 to March, 2002) were compared using pain scores, parent perception of pain ratings, length of stay, ventilator days, total cost, and opioid use. A total of 27 children were evaluated (13 historical control, 14 intervention). The two populations did not differ on age at transplant (mean age 53.8 vs. 63.6 months), sex (46.1% vs. 50% male), ethnicity (53.8% vs. 57.1% white, non-Hispanic) weight at transplant (17.5 vs. 24.7 kg), percent with biliary atresia as the primary reason for transplant (42.9% vs. 69.2%), percent with status 1 transplant listing score (38.5% vs. 50.0%), or public insurance status (30.8 vs. 57.2% with Medicaid). No differences were found in mean pediatric intensive care unit (PICU) postoperative length of stay (6.7 vs. 5.3 days), total postoperative length of stay (17.5 vs. 17.5 days), total inpatient length of stay (27.0 vs. 24.4 days), time to extubation (30 vs. 24.3 h), total cost (dollar 147,983 vs. dollar 157,882) or opioid use through postoperative day (POD) 6 (0.24 vs. 0.25 mg/kg/day morphine equivalent). A decrease in mean pain score between POD 0 and 6 (2.82 vs. 2.12; p = 0.047), a decrease in mean parental pain perception score (3.1 vs. 2.1; p = 0.001), and an increase in number of pain assessments per 12 h shift (3.43 vs. 6.79; p < 0.005) were seen. A comprehensive non-pharmacologic postoperative pain management program in children receiving a liver transplant was associated with decreased pain scores, improved parent perception of pain, and an increased number of pain assessments per 12 h shift. No increases in lengths of stay (PICU, postoperative, total), time to extubation, or total cost were found.

View details for DOI 10.1111/j.1399-3046.2005.00438.x

View details for Web of Science ID 000236026400011

View details for PubMedID 16573603

Food, toys, and love: pediatric palliative care. Current problems in pediatric and adolescent health care Sourkes, B., Frankel, L., Brown, M., Contro, N., Benitz, W., Case, C., Good, J., Jones, L., Komejan, J., Modderman-Marshall, J., Reichard, W., Sentivany-Collins, S., Sunde, C. 2005; 35 (9): 350-386

View details for PubMedID 16301200