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Kyle Hinman, MD

  • Kyle E Hinman

Specialties

Child & Adolescent Psychiatry

Work and Education

Professional Education

St Georges University School of Medicine Grenada West Indies, Great River, NY, West Indies, 2000

Internship

Maricopa Medical Center, Phoenix, AZ, 2001

Residency

Maricopa Medical Center, Phoenix, AZ, 2003

Fellowship

University Of New Mexico Hospital, *Albuquerque, NM, 2005

Board Certifications

Child & Adolescent Psychiatry, American Board of Psychiatry and Neurology

Psychiatry, American Board of Psychiatry and Neurology

All Publications

Risk factors for learning problems in youth with psychogenic non-epileptic seizures. Epilepsy & behavior Doss, J., Caplan, R., Siddarth, P., Bursch, B., Falcone, T., Forgey, M., Hinman, K., Curt LaFrance, W., Laptook, R., Shaw, R., Weisbrot, D., Willis, M., Plioplys, S. 2017; 70: 135-139

Abstract

This study examined the risk factors for learning problems (LP) in pediatric psychogenic non-epileptic seizures (PNES) and their specificity by comparing psychopathology, medical, cognitive/linguistic/achievement, bullying history, and parent education variables between subjects with PNES with and without LP and between subjects with PNES and siblings with LP.55 subjects with PNES and 35 siblings, aged 8-18years, underwent cognitive, linguistic, and achievement testing, and completed somatization and anxiety sensitivity questionnaires. A semi-structured psychiatric interview about the child was administered to each subject and parent. Child self-report and/or parent report provided information on the presence/absence of LP. Parents also provided each subject's medical, psychiatric, family, and bullying history information.Sixty percent (33/55) of the PNES and 49% (17/35) of the sibling subjects had LP. A multivariable logistic regression demonstrated that bullying and impaired formulation of a sentence using a stimulus picture and stimulus word were significantly associated with increased likelihood of LP in the PNES youth. In terms of the specificity of the LP risk factors, a similar analysis comparing LP in the youth with PNES and sibling groups identified anxiety disorder diagnoses and bullying as the significant risk factors associated with LP in the PNES youth.These findings emphasize the need to assess youth with PNES for LP, particularly if they have experienced bullying, have linguistic deficits, and meet criteria for anxiety disorder diagnoses.

View details for DOI 10.1016/j.yebeh.2017.03.016

View details for PubMedID 28427021

Intranasal oxytocin treatment for social deficits and biomarkers of response in children with autism. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America Parker, K. J., Oztan, O., Libove, R. A., Sumiyoshi, R. D., Jackson, L. P., Karhson, D. S., Summers, J. E., Hinman, K. E., Motonaga, K. S., Phillips, J. M., Carson, D. S., Garner, J. P., Hardan, A. Y. 2017; 114 (30): 811924

Abstract

Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is characterized by core social deficits. Prognosis is poor, in part, because existing medications target only associated ASD features. Emerging evidence suggests that the neuropeptide oxytocin (OXT) may be a blood-based biomarker of social functioning and a possible treatment for ASD. However, prior OXT treatment trials have produced equivocal results, perhaps because of variability in patients' underlying neuropeptide biology, but this hypothesis has not been tested. Using a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled, parallel design, we tested the efficacy and tolerability of 4-wk intranasal OXT treatment (24 International Units, twice daily) in 32 children with ASD, aged 6-12 y. When pretreatment neuropeptide measures were included in the statistical model, OXT compared with placebo treatment significantly enhanced social abilities in children with ASD [as measured by the trial's primary outcome measure, the Social Responsiveness Scale (SRS)]. Importantly, pretreatment blood OXT concentrations also predicted treatment response, such that individuals with the lowest pretreatment OXT concentrations showed the greatest social improvement. OXT was well tolerated, and its effects were specific to social functioning, with no observed decrease in repetitive behaviors or anxiety. Finally, as with many trials, some placebo-treated participants showed improvement on the SRS. This enhanced social functioning was mirrored by a posttreatment increase in their blood OXT concentrations, suggesting that increased endogenous OXT secretion may underlie this improvement. These findings indicate that OXT treatment enhances social abilities in children with ASD and that individuals with pretreatment OXT signaling deficits may stand to benefit the most from OXT treatment.

View details for DOI 10.1073/pnas.1705521114

View details for PubMedID 28696286

View details for PubMedCentralID PMC5544319

Risk factors for comorbid psychopathology in youth with psychogenic nonepileptic seizures SEIZURE-EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF EPILEPSY Plioplys, S., Doss, J., Siddarth, P., Bursch, B., Falcone, T., Forgey, M., Hinman, K., LaFrance, W. C., Laptook, R., Shaw, R. J., Weisbrot, D. M., Willis, M. D., Caplan, R. 2016; 38: 32-37

Abstract

To examine the risk factors for internalizing (anxiety, depression) and posttraumatic stress (PTSD) disorders, somatization, and anxiety sensitivity (AS) in youth with psychogenic non-epileptic seizures (PNES).55 probands with PNES and 35 siblings, aged 8-18 years, underwent a psychiatric interview, cognitive and language testing, and completed somatization and AS questionnaires. Parents provided the subjects' medical, psychiatric, family, and adversity history information.The risk factors for the probands' internalizing disorders (girls, older age of PNES onset), somatization (older age, epilepsy), and anxiety sensitivity (girls, adversities) differed from their siblings. The risk factors in the siblings, however, were similar to the general pediatric population. Proband depression was unrelated to the study's risk variables while PTSD was significantly associated with female gender and lower Full Scale IQ.Knowledge about the specificity of the risk factors for comorbid psychopathology in youth with PNES might facilitate their early identification and treatment.

View details for DOI 10.1016/j.seizure.2016.03.012

View details for Web of Science ID 000377834400007

View details for PubMedID 27085102

A multisite controlled study of risk factors in pediatric psychogenic nonepileptic seizures EPILEPSIA Plioplys, S., Doss, J., Siddarth, P., Bursch, B., Falcone, T., Forgey, M., Hinman, K., LaFrance, W. C., Laptook, R., Shaw, R. J., Weisbrot, D. M., Willis, M. D., Caplan, R. 2014; 55 (11): 1739-1747

View details for DOI 10.1111/epi.12773

View details for Web of Science ID 000345227400015

Anxiety and Special Impulse Control Disorders Handbook of Developmental Psychiatry Thienemann, M., Hinman, K., Bloch, M., Leckman, J. edited by Steiner, H. World Scientific. 2011: 91128