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Liora Schultz, MD

  • Liora Michal Schultz

Specialties

Hematology/Oncology

Hematology-Oncology

Work and Education

Professional Education

University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada, 6/6/2007

Internship

New York Presbyterian Hospital- Weill Cornell, New York, NY, 6/30/2008

Residency

New York Presbyterian Hospital- Weill Cornell, New York, NY, 6/30/2010

Fellowship

Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY, 6/30/2013

Board Certifications

Pediatric Hematology-Oncology, American Board of Pediatrics

Pediatrics, American Board of Pediatrics

Services

Oncology

Conditions Treated

Acute Leukemia

Graft-versus-Host Disease

Immune Reconstitiution

Stem Cell Transplant

All Publications

T-cell immunopeptidomes reveal cell subtype surface markers derived from intracellular proteins. Proteomics Olsson, N., Schultz, L. M., Zhang, L., Khodadoust, M. S., Narayan, R., Czerwinski, D. K., Levy, R., Elias, J. E. 2018

Abstract

Immunopeptidomes promise novel surface markers as ideal immunotherapy targets, but their characterization by mass spectrometry (MS) remains challenging. Until recently, cell numbers exceeding 109were needed to survey thousands of HLA ligands. Such limited analytical sensitivity has historically constrained the types of clinical specimens that can be evaluated to cell cultures or bulk tissues. Measuring immunopeptidomes from purified cell subpopulations would be preferable for many applications, particularly those evaluating rare, primary hematopoietic cell lineages. Here, we test the feasibility of immunopeptidome profiling from limited numbers of primary purified human regulatory T cells (TReg), conventional T cells (Tconv) and activated T cells. The combined T-cell immunopeptide dataset reported here contains 13,804 unique HLA ligands derived from 5,049 proteins. Of these, more than 700 HLA ligands were derived from 82 proteins that we exclusively identified from TReg-enriched cells. This study 1) demonstrates that primary, lineage-enriched T cell supbopulations recovered from single donors are compatible with immunopeptidome analysis; 2) presents new TReg-biased ligand candidates; and 3) supports immunopeptidome surveys value for revealing T cell biology that may not be apparent from expression data alone. Taken together, these findings open up new avenues for targeting TRegand abrogating their suppressive functions to treat cancer. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

View details for DOI 10.1002/pmic.201700410

View details for PubMedID 29493099

New developments in immunotherapy for pediatric solid tumors. Current opinion in pediatrics Schultz, L. M., Majzner, R., Davis, K. L., Mackall, C. 2017

Abstract

Building upon preclinical advances, we are uncovering immunotherapy strategies that are translating into improved outcomes in tumor subsets. Advanced pediatric solid tumors carry poor prognoses and resultant robust efforts to apply immunotherapy advances to pediatric solid tumors are in progress. Here, we discuss recent developments in the field using mAb and mAb-based therapies including checkpoint blockade and chimeric antigen receptors (CARs).The pediatric solid tumor mAb experience targeting the diganglioside, GD2, for patients with neuroblastoma has been the most compelling to date. GD2 and alternative antigen-specific mAbs are now being incorporated into antibody-drug conjugates, bispecific antibodies and CARs for treatment of solid tumors. CARs in pediatric solid tumors have not yet achieved comparative responses to the hematologic CAR experience; however, novel strategies such as bispecific targeting, intratumoral administration and improved understanding of T-cell biology may yield enhanced CAR-efficacy. Therapeutic effect using single-agent checkpoint blocking antibodies in pediatric solid tumors also remains limited to date. Combinatorial strategies continue to hold promise and the clinical effect in tumor subsets with high antigenic burden is being explored.Pediatric immunotherapy remains at early stages of translation, yet we anticipate that with advanced technology, we will achieve widespread, efficacious use of immunotherapy for pediatric solid tumors.

View details for DOI 10.1097/MOP.0000000000000564

View details for PubMedID 29189429

T-cell-based Immunotherapy: Adoptive Cell Transfer and Checkpoint Inhibition. Cancer immunology research Houot, R., Schultz, L. M., Marabelle, A., Kohrt, H. 2015; 3 (10): 1115-1122

View details for DOI 10.1158/2326-6066.CIR-15-0190

View details for PubMedID 26438444