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Sharon Chen, MD

  • Sharon F Chen

Specialties

Infectious Disease

Work and Education

Professional Education

Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX, 1996

Residency

University of Rochester, Rochester, NY, 1999

Fellowship

Stanford University Medical Center, Stanford, CA, 2003

Board Certifications

Pediatric Infectious Disease, American Board of Pediatrics

Pediatrics, American Board of Pediatrics

All Publications

Electrocardiographic repolarization abnormalities and increased risk of life-threatening arrhythmias in children with dilated cardiomyopathy HEART RHYTHM Chen, S., Motonaga, K. S., Hollander, S. A., Almond, C. S., Rosenthal, D. N., Kaufman, B. D., May, L. J., Avasarala, K., Dao, D. T., Dubin, A. M., Ceresnak, S. R. 2016; 13 (6): 1289-1296

Abstract

Life-threatening arrhythmia events (LTEs) occur in ~5% of children with dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM). While prolonged QRS duration has been shown to be associated with LTEs, electrocardiographic (ECG) repolarization findings have not been examined.We sought to determine the associations between ECG repolarization abnormalities and LTEs in children with DCM.A single-center retrospective review of children with DCM was performed. LTEs were defined as documented ventricular tachycardia or fibrillation requiring medical intervention. Three pediatric cardiologists, blinded to clinical events, evaluated ECGs obtained at the time of initial referral. Kaplan-Meier survival and Cox proportional hazards analyses were used to evaluate time to LTEs.A total of 137 patients (mean age 7.8 6.7 years; 75(55%) male patients) with DCM (mean ejection fraction 35% 16%) were included; 67 patients (49%) had a corrected JT (JTc) interval of 340 ms, 72 (53%) had a corrected QT (QTc) interval of 450 ms, and 41 (30%) had abnormal T waves. LTEs occurred in 15 patients at a median of 12 months (interquartile range 3-36 months) after the initial ECG. Patients with LTEs had a longer JTc interval (371 77 ms vs 342 41 ms; P = .02) and a longer QTc interval (488 96 ms vs 453 44 ms; P = .01). In survival analysis, a JTc interval of 390 ms (hazard ratio [HR] 4.07; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.12-14.83; P = .03), a QTc interval of 510 ms (HR 6.95; 95% CI 1.53-31.49; P = .01), abnormal T-wave inversion (HR 11.62; 95% CI 2.75-49.00; P = .001), and ST-segment depression (HR 6.91; 95% CI 1.25-38.27; P = .03) were associated with an increased risk of LTEs, even after adjusting for QRS duration and amiodarone use.Repolarization abnormalities are common in children with DCM. Certain ECG repolarization abnormalities, such as significantly prolonged JTc and QTc intervals, may be useful in identifying patients at risk of LTEs.

View details for DOI 10.1016/j.hrthm.2016.02.014

View details for Web of Science ID 000376334800016

View details for PubMedID 26945851

Impact of ventricular assist device placement on longitudinal renal function in children with end-stage heart failure. journal of heart and lung transplantation May, L. J., Montez-Rath, M. E., Yeh, J., Axelrod, D. M., Chen, S., Maeda, K., Almond, C. S., Rosenthal, D. N., Hollander, S. A., Sutherland, S. M. 2016; 35 (4): 449-456

Abstract

Although ventricular assist devices (VADs) restore hemodynamics in those with heart failure, reversibility of end-organ dysfunction with VAD support is not well characterized. Renal function often improves in adults after VAD placement, but this has not been comprehensively explored in children.Sixty-three children on VAD support were studied. Acute kidney injury (AKI) was defined by Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes criteria. Estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) was determined by the Schwartz method. Generalized linear mixed-effects models compared the pre-VAD and post-VAD eGFR for the cohort and sub-groups with and without pre-VAD renal dysfunction (pre-VAD eGFR < 90 ml/min/1.73 m(2)).The pre-VAD eGFR across the cohort was 84.0 ml/min/1.73 m(2) (interquartile range [IQR] 62.3-122.7), and 55.6% (34 of 63) had pre-VAD renal dysfunction. AKI affected 60.3% (38 of 63), with similar rates in those with and without pre-existing renal dysfunction. Within the cohort, the nadir eGFR occurred 1 day post-operatively (62.9 ml/min/1.73 m(2); IQR, 51.2-88.9 ml/min/1.73 m(2); p < 0.001). By Day 5, however, the eGFR exceeded the baseline (99.0 ml/min/1.73 m(2); IQR, 59.3-146.7 ml/min/1.73 m(2); p = 0.03) and remained significantly higher through the first post-operative week. After adjusting for age, gender, and AKI, the eGFR continued to increase throughout the entire 180-day study period ( = 0.0025; 95% confidence interval, 0.0015-0.0036; p < 0.001). Patients with pre-VAD renal dysfunction experienced the greatest improvement in the eGFR ( = 0.0051 vs = 0.0013, p < 0.001).Renal dysfunction is prevalent in children with heart failure undergoing VAD placement. Although peri-operative AKI is common, renal function improves substantially in the first post-operative week and for months thereafter. This is particularly pronounced in those with pre-VAD renal impairment, suggesting that VADs may facilitate recovery and maintenance of kidney function in children with advanced heart failure.

View details for DOI 10.1016/j.healun.2015.10.039

View details for PubMedID 26653933

Outpatient Outcomes of Pediatric Patients with Left Ventricular Assist Devices. ASAIO journal Chen, S., Lin, A., Liu, E., Gowan, M., May, L. J., Doan, L. N., Almond, C. S., Maeda, K., Reinhartz, O., Hollander, S. A., Rosenthal, D. N. 2016; 62 (2): 163-168

Abstract

Outpatient experience of children supported with continuous flow ventricular assist devices (CFVAD) is limited. We reviewed our experience with children discharged with CF-VAD support.All pediatric patients <18 years old with CF-VADs implanted at our institution were included. Discharge criteria included a stable medication regimen, completion of a VAD education program and standardized rehabilitation plan, and presence of a caregiver. Hospital re-admissions (excluding scheduled admissions) were reviewed. Adverse events were defined by INTERMACS criteria.Of 17 patients with CF-VADs, 8(47%) were discharged from the hospital (1 Heartware HVAD, 7 Heartmate II). Median age was 15.3(range 9.6-17.1) years and weight was 50.6(33.6-141) kg. Device strategies were destination therapy (n=4) and bridge to transplant (n=4). Patients spent a median 49(26-107) days hospitalized post-implant and had 2(1-5) hospital re-admissions. Total support duration was 3154 patient-days, with 2413 as outpatient. Most frequent adverse events were device malfunction and arrhythmias. There was one death due to pump thrombosis, and no bleeding or stroke events. Overall adverse event rate was 15.22 per 100-patient-months.Early experience suggests that children with CF-VADs can be safely discharged. Device malfunction and arrhythmia were the most common adverse events but were recognized quickly with structured outpatient surveillance.

View details for DOI 10.1097/MAT.0000000000000324

View details for PubMedID 26720740

A novel pediatric treatment intensity score: development and feasibility in heart failure patients with ventricular assist devices JOURNAL OF HEART AND LUNG TRANSPLANTATION May, L. J., Ploutz, M., Hollander, S. A., Reinhartz, O., Almond, C. S., Chen, S., Maeda, K., Kaufman, B. D., Yeh, J., Rosenthal, D. N. 2015; 34 (4): 509-515

Abstract

The evolution of pharmacologic therapies and mechanical support including ventricular assist devices (VADs) has broadened the scope of care available to children with advanced heart failure. At the present time, there are only limited means of quantifying disease severity or the concomitant morbidity for this population. This study describes the development of a novel pediatric treatment intensity score (TIS), designed to quantify the burden of illness and clinical trajectory in children on VAD support.There were 5 clinical domains assessed: nutrition, respiratory support, activity level, cardiovascular medications, and care environment. A scale was developed through expert consensus. Higher scores indicate greater morbidity as reflected by intensity of medical management. To evaluate feasibility and face validity, the TIS was applied retrospectively to a subset of pediatric inpatients with VADs. The Bland-Altman method was used to assess limits of agreement.The study comprised 39 patients with 42 implantations. Bland-Altman interobserver and intraobserver comparisons showed good agreement (mean differences in scores of 0.02, limits of agreement 0.12). Trends in TIS were concordant with the overall clinical impression of improvement. Scores remained 0.6 preceding VAD implantation and peaked at 0.71 3 days after VAD implantation.We describe a pediatric VAD scoring tool, to assess global patient morbidity and clinical recovery. We demonstrate feasibility of using this TIS in a test population of inpatients on VAD support.

View details for DOI 10.1016/j.healun.2014.10.007

View details for Web of Science ID 000353251200006

Quality of life and metrics of achievement in long-term adult survivors of pediatric heart transplant PEDIATRIC TRANSPLANTATION Hollander, S. A., Chen, S., Luikart, H., Burge, M., Hollander, A. M., Rosenthal, D. N., Maeda, K., Hunt, S. A., Bernstein, D. 2015; 19 (1): 76-81

Abstract

Many children who undergo heart transplantation will survive into adulthood. We sought to examine the QOL and capacity for achievement in long-term adult survivors of pediatric heart transplantation. Adults >18yr of age who received transplants as children (18yr old) and had survived for at least 10yr post-transplant completed two self-report questionnaires: (i) Ferrans & Powers QLI, in which life satisfaction is reported as an overall score and in four subscale domains and is then indexed from 0 (very dissatisfied) to 1 (very satisfied); and (ii) a "Metrics of Life Achievement" questionnaire regarding income, education, relationships, housing status, and access to health care. A total of 20 subjects completed the survey. The overall mean QLI score was 0.770.16. Subjects were most satisfied in the family domain (0.840.21) and least satisfied in the psychological/spiritual domain (0.70.28). Satisfaction in the domains of health/functioning and socioeconomic were intermediate at 0.78 and 0.76, respectively. Most respondents had graduated from high school, reported a median annual income >$50000/yr, and lived independently. Adult survivors of pediatric heart transplant report a good QOL and demonstrate the ability to obtain an education, work, and live independently.

View details for DOI 10.1111/petr.12384

View details for Web of Science ID 000346915200021

Reliability of echocardiographic measurements of left ventricular systolic function in potential pediatric heart transplant donors JOURNAL OF HEART AND LUNG TRANSPLANTATION Chen, S., Tierney, E. S., Khush, K. K., John Nguyen, J., Goldstein, B. A., May, L. J., Hollander, S. A., Kaufman, B. D., Rosenthal, D. N. 2015; 34 (1): 100-106

Abstract

Echocardiogram reports, but not images, are usually available for the evaluation of potential donor hearts. To assess the reliability of local reports of potential pediatric heart donors, we compared echocardiographic measurements of left ventricular (LV) systolic function between local hospitals and a central echocardiography laboratory.We identified all potential donors aged <18 years managed by the California Transplant Donor Network from 2009 to 2013. Echocardiograms and reports were obtained from local hospitals. All studies were reviewed in a central laboratory by an experienced pediatric cardiologist blinded to local reports. Local and central measurements of fractional shortening (FS) were compared using the Bland-Altman method (mean difference 2 standard deviations). LV function was categorized based on FS as normal or mild, moderately, or severely depressed.There were 70 studies from 59 donors with local and central measurements of FS. The mean difference between local and central FS was 3.9 9.0. The limits of agreement ranged from -14.2 to 22. Twenty-five studies had discordant measurements of LV function, with 17 discordant by 1 category and 8 by 2 or more categories. Of 55 studies categorized as normal by local measurement, 6 were moderately to severely depressed by central review. Of 15 studies categorized as depressed by local measurement, 3 were normal by central review.Local and central measurements of LV systolic function were discordant in 36% of studies. Given such discordance, efforts to obtain and view actual echocardiographic images should be part of the standard evaluation of potential pediatric heart donors.

View details for DOI 10.1016/j.healun.2014.08.019

View details for Web of Science ID 000348273400012

Feasibility of Neonatal Pulse Wave Velocity and Association with Maternal Hemoglobin A(1c) NEONATOLOGY Chen, S., Chetty, S., Lowenthal, A., Evans, J. M., Vu, C., Stauffer, K. J., Lyell, D., Tierney, E. S. 2015; 107 (1): 20-26

View details for DOI 10.1159/000366467

View details for Web of Science ID 000346246300004

HLA desensitization with bortezomib in a highly sensitized pediatric patient PEDIATRIC TRANSPLANTATION May, L. J., Yeh, J., Maeda, K., Tyan, D. B., Chen, S., Kaufman, B. D., Bernstein, D., Rosenthal, D. N., Hollander, S. A. 2014; 18 (8): E280-E282

View details for DOI 10.1111/petr.12347

View details for Web of Science ID 000344360500006

Successful Bridge to Transplant with a Continuous Flow Ventricular Assist Device in a Single Ventricle Patient with an Aortopulmonary Shunt ASAIO JOURNAL Lal, A. K., Chen, S., Maeda, K., McCammond, A., Rosenthal, D. N., Reinhartz, O., Yeh, J. 2014; 60 (1): 119-121

Abstract

Ventricular assist devices are frequently used to bridge pediatric patients to cardiac transplantation; however, experience in single ventricle patients with aortopulmonary shunts remains limited. This case report addresses the challenge of balancing pulmonary and systemic circulation with a focus on the role of continuous versus pulsatile ventricular assist device support.

View details for DOI 10.1097/MAT.0000000000000007

View details for Web of Science ID 000329368600021

How useful are B-type natriuretic peptide measurements for monitoring changes in patent ductus arteriosus shunt magnitude? JOURNAL OF PERINATOLOGY Chen, S., Tacy, T., Clyman, R. 2010; 30 (12): 780-785

Abstract

Although B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) concentrations seem to be useful for detecting the presence of patent ductus arteriosus, there is no information about their usefulness for monitoring changes in PDA shunt magnitude.We performed a retrospective analysis of paired BNP-echocardiogram measurements (obtained from infants (24 to 32 weeks gestation) with clinical suspicion of PDA).Individual BNP concentrations (n=146, from 88 infants) were significantly related to shunt magnitude at the time of measurement and had good discriminating power for detecting a moderate-or-large shunt (area under receiver-operator characteristic curves (ROC-AUC)=0.85). In total, 36 infants had serial BNP-echocardiogram pairs (n=91) measured during their hospitalization. Changes (either increases or decreases) in BNP concentrations over time had only fair discriminating power (ROC-AUC=0.76) for detecting increases or decreases, respectively, in shunt magnitude.The high degree of variability in the BNP measurements made them less useful for monitoring changes in magnitude.

View details for DOI 10.1038/jp.2010.47

View details for Web of Science ID 000284693200004

View details for PubMedID 20376057

Novel protocol including liver biopsy to identify and treat CD8+T-cell predominant acute hepatitis and liver failure PEDIATRIC TRANSPLANTATION McKenzie, R. B., Berquist, W. E., Nadeau, K. C., Louie, C. Y., Chen, S. F., Sibley, R. K., Glader, B. E., Wong, W. B., Hofmann, L. V., Esquivel, C. O., Cox, K. L. 2014; 18 (5): 503-509

Abstract

In the majority of children with ALF, the etiology is unknown and liver transplantation is often needed for survival. A patient case prompted us to consider that immune dysregulation may be the cause of indeterminate acute hepatitis and liver failure in children. Our study includes nine pediatric patients treated under a multidisciplinary clinical protocol to identify and treat immune-mediated acute liver injury. Patients with evidence of inflammation and no active infection on biopsy received treatment with intravenous immune globulin and methylprednisolone. Seven patients had at least one positive immune marker before or after treatment. All patients had a CD8+ T-cell predominant liver injury that completely or partially responded to immune therapy. Five of the nine patients recovered liver function and did not require liver transplantation. Three of these patients subsequently developed bone marrow failure and were treated with either immunosuppression or stem cell transplant. This series highlights the importance of this tissue-based approach to diagnosis and treatment that may improve transplant-free survival. Further research is necessary to better characterize the immune injury and to predict the subset of patients at risk for bone marrow failure who may benefit from earlier and stronger immunosuppressive therapy.

View details for DOI 10.1111/petr.12296

View details for Web of Science ID 000339160400024

View details for PubMedID 24930635

Longitudinal Kinetics of Cytomegalovirus-specific T-cell Immunity and Viral Replication in Infants with Congenital Cytomegalovirus Infection Journal of the Pediatric Infectious Diseases Society Chen, S. F., Holmes, T. H., Slifer, T., Ramachandran, V., Mackey, S., Hebson, C., Arvin, A. M., Lewis, D. B., Dekker, C. L. 2014

View details for DOI 10.1093/jpids/piu089

BK Polyomavirus Subtype III in a Pediatric Renal Transplant Patient with Nephropathy JOURNAL OF CLINICAL MICROBIOLOGY Kapusinszky, B., Chen, S. F., Sahoo, M. K., Lefterova, M. I., Kjelson, L., Grimm, P. C., Kambham, N., Concepcion, W., Pinsky, B. A. 2013; 51 (12): 4255-4258

Abstract

BK polyomavirus (BKV) is an emerging pathogen in immunocompromised individuals. BKV subtype III is rarely identified and has not previously been associated with disease. Here we provide the whole-genome sequence of a subtype III BKV from a pediatric kidney transplant patient with polyomavirus-associated nephropathy.

View details for DOI 10.1128/JCM.01801-13

View details for Web of Science ID 000327147100067

View details for PubMedID 24048534

Human Parvovirus B19 in Solid Organ Transplantation AMERICAN JOURNAL OF TRANSPLANTATION Eid, A. J., Chen, S. F. 2013; 13: 201-205

View details for DOI 10.1111/ajt.12111

View details for Web of Science ID 000315907900021

View details for PubMedID 23465012

Antiviral CD8 T cells in the control of primary human cytomegalovirus infection in early childhood JOURNAL OF INFECTIOUS DISEASES Chen, S. F., Tu, W. W., Sharp, M. A., Tongson, E. C., He, X. S., Greenberg, H. B., Holmes, T. H., Wang, Z. T., Kemble, G., Manganello, A. M., Adler, S. P., Dekker, C. L., Levvis, D. B., Arvin, A. M. 2004; 189 (9): 1619-1627

Abstract

Human cytomegalovirus (CMV) establishes persistent infection, with control of replication thought to be mediated by CMV-specific CD8 T cells. Primary CMV infection commonly affects young children and causes prolonged viral shedding in saliva and urine. We investigated whether this virus-host interaction pattern reflects a developmental deficiency of antiviral CD8 T cell-mediated immunity during childhood. CMV-specific CD8 T cell responses in asymptomatic children with active infection were not different from adults with recent or long-term infection in frequency and functional analyses. High urine CMV concentrations were detected, despite these CMV-specific CD8 T cell responses. We conclude that delayed resolution of primary CMV infection in young children is not caused by a deficient CMV-specific CD8 T cell response. Because these healthy children continue to have local CMV replication, we suggest that CD8 T cells may function primarily to prevent symptomatic, disseminated disease.

View details for Web of Science ID 000220951300010

View details for PubMedID 15116298

Persistent and selective deficiency of CD4(+) T cell immunity to cytomegalovirus in immunocompetent young children JOURNAL OF IMMUNOLOGY Tu, W. W., Chen, S., Sharp, M., Dekker, C., Manganello, A. M., Tongson, E. C., Maecker, H. T., Holmes, T. H., Wang, Z. T., Kemble, G., Adler, S., Arvin, A., Lewis, D. B. 2004; 172 (5): 3260-3267

Abstract

Healthy young children who acquire CMV have prolonged viral shedding into the urine and saliva, but whether this is attributable to limitations in viral-specific immune responses has not been explored. In this study, we found that otherwise immunocompetent young children after recent primary CMV infection accumulated markedly fewer CMV-specific CD4(+) T cells that produced IFN-gamma than did adults. These differences in CD4(+) T cell function persisted for more than 1 year after viral acquisition, and did not apply to CMV-specific IFN-gamma production by CD8(+) T cells. The IFN-gamma-producing CD4(+) T cells of children or adults that were reactive with CMV Ags were mainly the CCR7(low) cell subset of memory (CD45R0(high)CD45RA(low)) cells. The decreased IFN-gamma response to CMV in children was selective, because their CCR7(low) memory CD4(+) T cells and those of adults produced similar levels of this cytokine after stimulation with staphylococcal enterotoxin B superantigen. CD4(+) T cells from children also had reduced CMV-specific IL-2 and CD154 (CD40 ligand) expression, suggesting an early blockade in the differentiation of viral-specific CD4(+) T cells. Following CMV acquisition, children, but not adults, persistently shed virus in urine, and this was observable for at least 29 mo postinfection. Thus, CD4(+) T cell-mediated immunity to CMV in humans is generated in an age-dependent manner, and may have a substantial role in controlling renal viral replication and urinary shedding.

View details for Web of Science ID 000189186000069

View details for PubMedID 14978134

Molecular and Culture-Based Bronchoalveolar Lavage Fluid Testing for the Diagnosis of Cytomegalovirus Pneumonitis. Open forum infectious diseases Tan, S. K., Burgener, E. B., Waggoner, J. J., Gajurel, K., Gonzalez, S., Chen, S. F., Pinsky, B. A. 2016; 3 (1): ofv212-?

Abstract

Background. Cytomegalovirus (CMV) is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in immunocompromised patients, with CMV pneumonitis among the most severe manifestations of infection. Although bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) samples are frequently tested for CMV, the clinical utility of such testing remains uncertain. Methods. Retrospective analysis of adult patients undergoing BAL testing via CMV polymerase chain reaction (PCR), shell vial culture, and conventional viral culture between August 2008 and May 2011 was performed. Cytomegalovirus diagnostic methods were compared with a comprehensive definition of CMV pneumonitis that takes into account signs and symptoms, underlying host immunodeficiency, radiographic findings, and laboratory results. Results. Seven hundred five patients underwent 1077 bronchoscopy episodes with 1090 BAL specimens sent for CMV testing. Cytomegalovirus-positive patients were more likely to be hematopoietic cell transplant recipients (26% vs 8%, P < .0001) and less likely to have an underlying condition not typically associated with lung disease (3% vs 20%, P < .0001). Histopathology was performed in only 17.3% of CMV-positive bronchoscopy episodes. When CMV diagnostic methods were evaluated against the comprehensive definition, the sensitivity and specificity of PCR, shell vial culture, and conventional culture were 91.3% and 94.6%, 54.4% and 97.4%, and 28.3% and 96.5%, respectively. Compared with culture, PCR provided significantly higher sensitivity and negative predictive value (P .001), without significantly lower positive predictive value. Cytomegalovirus quantitation did not improve test performance, resulting in a receiver operating characteristic curve with an area under the curve of 0.53. Conclusions. Cytomegalovirus PCR combined with a comprehensive clinical definition provides a pragmatic approach for the diagnosis of CMV pneumonitis.

View details for DOI 10.1093/ofid/ofv212

View details for PubMedID 26885542

Limited Variation in BK Virus T-Cell Epitopes Revealed by Next-Generation Sequencing JOURNAL OF CLINICAL MICROBIOLOGY Sahoo, M. K., Tan, S. K., Chen, S. F., Kapusinszky, B., Concepcion, K. R., Kjelson, L., Mallempati, K., Farina, H. M., Fernandez-Vina, M., Tyan, D., Grimm, P. C., Anderson, M. W., Concepcion, W., Pinsky, B. A. 2015; 53 (10): 3226-3233

Abstract

BK virus (BKV) infection and end-organ disease remains a formidable challenge to the hematopoietic cell transplant (HCT) and kidney transplant fields. As BKV-specific treatments are limited, immunologic-based therapies may be a promising and novel therapeutic option for transplant recipients with persistent BKV infection. Here, we describe a whole-genome, deep sequencing methodology and bioinformatics pipeline that identifies BKV variants across the genome and at BKV-specific HLA-A2, HLA-B0702, and HLA-B08 restricted CD8 T-cell epitopes. BKV whole genomes were amplified using long-range PCR with four inverse primer sets and fragmentation libraries were sequenced on the Ion Torrent PGM. An error model and variant calling algorithm were developed to accurately identify rare variants. 65 samples from 18 pediatric HCT and kidney recipients with quantifiable BKV DNAemia underwent whole-genome sequencing. Limited genetic variation was observed. The median number of amino acid variants identified per sample was 8 (range 2-37, interquartile range 10), with the majority of variants (77%) detected at a frequency of less than 5%. When normalized for length, there was no statistical difference in the median number of variants across all genes. Similarly, the predominant virus population within samples harbored T-cell epitopes similar to the reference BKV strain that was matched for BKV genotype. Despite the conservation of epitopes, low-level variants in T-cell epitopes were detected in 77.7% (14/18) of patients. Understanding epitope variation across the whole genome provides insight into the virus-immune interface and may help guide the development of protocols for novel immunologic-based therapies.

View details for DOI 10.1128/JCM.01385-15

View details for Web of Science ID 000365625300017

Pleural Effusion and Fever in an Immunocompromised Patient. Journal of the Pediatric Infectious Diseases Society Kay, A. W., Itoh, M., Valdez, J., Chen, S. F., Mathew, R., Gans, H. A. 2015; 4 (1): e6-9

View details for DOI 10.1093/jpids/piu018

View details for PubMedID 26407371

Pleural Effusion and Fever in an Immunocompromised Patient. JOURNAL OF THE PEDIATRIC INFECTIOUS DISEASES SOCIETY Kay, A. W., Itoh, M., Valdez, J., Chen, S. F., Matthew, R., Gans, H. A. 2014

View details for DOI 10.1093/jpids/piu018

Conversion From Tacrolimus/Mycophenolic Acid to Tacrolimus/Leflunomide to Treat Cutaneous Warts in a Series of Four Pediatric Renal Allograft Recipients TRANSPLANTATION Lieuko Nguyen, L., McClellan, R. B., Chaudhuri, A., Alexander, S. R., Chen, S. F., Concepcion, W., Grimm, P. 2012; 94 (5): 450-455

Abstract

The challenge of immunosuppression in pediatric renal transplantation is to balance preventing rejection while avoiding infectious complications. A dermatological complication of immunosuppression is viral warts, which cause significant disfigurement and increase the risk of skin malignancy.We present three pediatric and adolescent renal allograft recipients with multiple, recalcitrant verrucae vulgares lesions and one patient with molluscum contagiosum who were switched from mycophenolate mofetil to leflunomide. Teriflunomide metabolite levels were carefully maintained between 50,000 and 100,000 ng/mL to balance its immunosuppressive and antiviral properties. No adverse events requiring discontinuation of leflunomide were encountered.Switching from mycophenolate mofetil to leflunomide successfully cleared verrucae vulgares and molluscum lesions in all four renal transplant patients.The ability to minimize and even resolve warts can improve quality of life by reducing risk of skin malignancies and emotional distress in solid organ transplant patients. Leflunomide is a potential therapeutic option for posttransplantation patients with skin warts because it serves both as an adjunct to the immunosuppressive regimen and an antiviral agent.

View details for DOI 10.1097/TP.0b013e318264351e

View details for Web of Science ID 000308668000012

View details for PubMedID 22960763

Mycobacterium bovis disease in a pediatric renal transplant patient PEDIATRIC INFECTIOUS DISEASE JOURNAL Chen, S. F., Gutierrez, K. 2006; 25 (6): 564-566

Abstract

We describe a pediatric renal transplant patient with Mycobacterium bovis disease who was successfully treated using an antituberculosis regimen that included rifampin. We discuss the history of M. bovis and the diagnosis and management of M. bovis infection in renal transplant patients.

View details for DOI 10.1097/01.inf.0000219482.75490.d5

View details for Web of Science ID 000238432300020

View details for PubMedID 16732161

Staphylococcus aureus decolonization PEDIATRIC INFECTIOUS DISEASE JOURNAL Chen, S. F. 2005; 24 (1): 79-80
Acute retinal necrosis syndrome in a child PEDIATRIC INFECTIOUS DISEASE JOURNAL Chen, S., Weinberg, G. A. 2002; 21 (1): 78-80

Abstract

We recently cared for an 11-year-old child with acute retinal necrosis syndrome, an ophthalmologic condition characterized by the triad of anterior uveitis, occlusive retinal vasculitis and progressive peripheral retinal necrosis. Acute retinal necrosis syndrome occurs primarily in nonimmunocompromised adults as a result of reactivated herpes simplex or varicella-zoster virus infection. Antiviral and antiinflammatory therapy appears to reduce the incidence of vision-threatening retinal necrosis and involvement of the contralateral eye.

View details for Web of Science ID 000173306400020

View details for PubMedID 11791109