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Mary Sanders, PhD

  • Mary J Sanders

Especialidades

Psychology

Trabajo y Educación

Internado

VA Medical Center Palo Alto, Palo Alto, CA, 1985

Compañerismo

Lucile Packard Children's Hospital, Palo Alto, CA, 1991

Condiciones Tratadas

Eating Disorders

Todo Publicaciones

Forensic assessment of illness falsification, Munchausen by proxy, and factitious disorder, NOS. Child maltreatment Sanders, M. J., Bursch, B. 2002; 7 (2): 112-124

Abstract

The purpose of this article is to propose guidelines for the evaluation of possible Munchausen by proxy child abuse for the court systems. These assessments require the evaluator to have an understanding of the complexity involved when this type of abuse is alleged. The evaluator should have an appreciation of how falsification of illness may or may not occur, recognize the need for careful analysis of medical records, and understand the problems associated with the use of a profile in determining the validity of an abuse allegation. This article presents guidelines for gathering pertinent data, analyzing records, and evaluating psychological testing for forensic evaluations when the questions for the evaluation are the following: (a) Is there evidence that child abuse did occur? (b) Does the alleged perpetrator meet criteria forfactitious disorder, NOS (or factitious disorder by proxy)? and (c) What management and treatment recommendations should be made?

View details for PubMedID 12020067

Body dissatisfaction and dieting in young children INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF EATING DISORDERS Schur, E. A., Sanders, M., Steiner, H. 2000; 27 (1): 74-82

Abstract

To develop a broader understanding of young children's knowledge and beliefs about dieting and body dissatisfaction.Sixty-two third through sixth-grade boys and girls completed audiotaped interviews and questionnaires regarding eating behavior, attitudes toward dieting, and body dissatisfaction.Fifty percent of all children wanted to weigh less and 16% reported attempting weight loss. Children were well informed about dieting and were most likely to believe that dieting meant changing food choices and exercising as opposed to restricting intake. Their primary source of information was the family. Seventy-seven percent of children mentioned hearing about dieting from a family member, usually a parent.Young children are knowledgeable about dieting and the concept of dieting does not necessarily mean caloric restriction to them. These data suggest that the family can play a powerful role in countering the development of eating concerns and body dissatisfaction in children.

View details for Web of Science ID 000084531300008

View details for PubMedID 10590451

A MODEL FOR MANAGING CLINICAL AND PERSONNEL ISSUES IN C-L PSYCHIATRY - THE DEPARTMENT OF PEDIATRIC PSYCHIATRY AT CHILDRENS-HOSPITAL-AT-STANFORD PSYCHOSOMATICS Steiner, H., Sanders, M., CANNING, E. H., Litt, I. 1994; 35 (1): 73-79

View details for Web of Science ID A1994MN51600009

View details for PubMedID 8134532