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Rebecca Blankenburg, MD

  • Rebecca L. Blankenburg

Trabajo y Educación

Formación Profesional

University of Chicago, Chicago, IL, 2001

Internado

Univ of California San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, 2002

Residencia

Univ of California San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, 2004

Certificaciones Médicas

Pediatrics, American Board of Pediatrics

Todo Publicaciones

Families as Partners in Hospital Error and Adverse Event Surveillance. JAMA pediatrics Khan, A., Coffey, M., Litterer, K. P., Baird, J. D., Furtak, S. L., Garcia, B. M., Ashland, M. A., Calaman, S., Kuzma, N. C., O'Toole, J. K., Patel, A., Rosenbluth, G., Destino, L. A., Everhart, J. L., Good, B. P., Hepps, J. H., Dalal, A. K., Lipsitz, S. R., Yoon, C. S., Zigmont, K. R., Srivastava, R., Starmer, A. J., Sectish, T. C., Spector, N. D., West, D. C., Landrigan, C. P., Allair, B. K., Alminde, C., Alvarado-Little, W., Atsatt, M., Aylor, M. E., Bale, J. F., Balmer, D., Barton, K. T., Beck, C., Bismilla, Z., Blankenberg, R. L., Chandler, D., Choudhary, A., Christensen, E., Coghlan-McDonald, S., Cole, F. S., Corless, E., Cray, S., Da Silva, R., Dahale, D., Dreyer, B., Growdon, A. S., Gubler, L., Guiot, A., Harris, R., Haskell, H., Kocolas, I., Kruvand, E., Lane, M. M., Langrish, K., Ledford, C. J., Lewis, K., Lopreiato, J. O., Maloney, C. G., Mangan, A., Markle, P., Mendoza, F., Micalizzi, D. A., Mittal, V., Obermeyer, M., O'Donnell, K. A., Ottolini, M., Patel, S. J., Pickler, R., Rogers, J. E., Sanders, L. M., Sauder, K., Shah, S. S., Sharma, M., Simpkin, A., Subramony, A., Thompson, E. D., Trueman, L., Trujillo, T., Turmelle, M. P., Warnick, C., Welch, C., White, A. J., Wien, M. F., Winn, A. S., Wintch, S., Wolf, M., Yin, H. S., Yu, C. E. 2017

Abstract

Medical errors and adverse events (AEs) are common among hospitalized children. While clinician reports are the foundation of operational hospital safety surveillance and a key component of multifaceted research surveillance, patient and family reports are not routinely gathered. We hypothesized that a novel family-reporting mechanism would improve incident detection.To compare error and AE rates (1) gathered systematically with vs without family reporting, (2) reported by families vs clinicians, and (3) reported by families vs hospital incident reports.We conducted a prospective cohort study including the parents/caregivers of 989 hospitalized patients 17 years and younger (total 3902 patient-days) and their clinicians from December 2014 to July 2015 in 4 US pediatric centers. Clinician abstractors identified potential errors and AEs by reviewing medical records, hospital incident reports, and clinician reports as well as weekly and discharge Family Safety Interviews (FSIs). Two physicians reviewed and independently categorized all incidents, rating severity and preventability (agreement, 68%-90%; , 0.50-0.68). Discordant categorizations were reconciled. Rates were generated using Poisson regression estimated via generalized estimating equations to account for repeated measures on the same patient.Error and AE rates.Overall, 746 parents/caregivers consented for the study. Of these, 717 completed FSIs. Their median (interquartile range) age was 32.5 (26-40) years; 380 (53.0%) were nonwhite, 566 (78.9%) were female, 603 (84.1%) were English speaking, and 380 (53.0%) had attended college. Of 717 parents/caregivers completing FSIs, 185 (25.8%) reported a total of 255 incidents, which were classified as 132 safety concerns (51.8%), 102 nonsafety-related quality concerns (40.0%), and 21 other concerns (8.2%). These included 22 preventable AEs (8.6%), 17 nonharmful medical errors (6.7%), and 11 nonpreventable AEs (4.3%) on the study unit. In total, 179 errors and 113 AEs were identified from all sources. Family reports included 8 otherwise unidentified AEs, including 7 preventable AEs. Error rates with family reporting (45.9 per 1000 patient-days) were 1.2-fold (95% CI, 1.1-1.2) higher than rates without family reporting (39.7 per 1000 patient-days). Adverse event rates with family reporting (28.7 per 1000 patient-days) were 1.1-fold (95% CI, 1.0-1.2; P=.006) higher than rates without (26.1 per 1000 patient-days). Families and clinicians reported similar rates of errors (10.0 vs 12.8 per 1000 patient-days; relative rate, 0.8; 95% CI, .5-1.2) and AEs (8.5 vs 6.2 per 1000 patient-days; relative rate, 1.4; 95% CI, 0.8-2.2). Family-reported error rates were 5.0-fold (95% CI, 1.9-13.0) higher and AE rates 2.9-fold (95% CI, 1.2-6.7) higher than hospital incident report rates.Families provide unique information about hospital safety and should be included in hospital safety surveillance in order to facilitate better design and assessment of interventions to improve safety.

View details for DOI 10.1001/jamapediatrics.2016.4812

View details for PubMedID 28241211

The Discriminatory Patient and Family: Strategies to Address Discrimination Towards Trainees ACADEMIC MEDICINE Whitgob, E. E., Blankenburg, R. L., Bogetz, A. L. 2016; 91 (11): S64-S69
Pediatric Resident Workload Intensity and Variability PEDIATRICS Was, A., Blankenburg, R., Park, K. T. 2016; 138 (1)

Abstract

Research on resident workloads has focused primarily on the quantity of hours worked, rather than the content of those hours or the variability among residents. We hypothesize that there are statistically significant variations in resident workloads and better understanding of workload intensity could improve resident education.The Stanford Children's Health research database was queried for all electronic notes and orders written by pediatric residents from June 2012 to March 2014. The dataset was narrowed to ensure an accurate comparison among residents. A survey was used to determine residents' self-perceived workload intensity. Variability of total notes written and orders entered was analyzed by (2) test and a Monte Carlo simulation. Linear regression was used to analyze the correlation between note-writing and order-entry workload intensity.A total of 20280 notes and 112214 orders were written by 26 pediatric interns during 6 core rotations between June 2012 and June 2013. Both order-entry and note-writing workload intensity showed highly significant (P < .001) variability among residents. "High workload" residents, defined as the top quartile of total workload intensity, wrote 91% more orders and 19% more notes than "low workload" residents in the bottom quartile. Statistically significant correlation was observed between note-writing and order-entry workload intensity (R(2) = 0.22; P = .02). There was no significant correlation between residents' self-perceived workload intensity and their objective workload.Significant variations in workload exist among pediatric residents. This may contribute to heterogeneous educational opportunities, physician wellness, and quality of patient care.

View details for DOI 10.1542/peds.2015-4371

View details for Web of Science ID 000378853100022

View details for PubMedID 27358473

Caring for Children With Medical Complexity: Challenges and Educational Opportunities Identified by Pediatric Residents. Academic pediatrics Bogetz, J. F., Bogetz, A. L., Rassbach, C. E., Gabhart, J. M., Blankenburg, R. L. 2015; 15 (6): 621-625

Abstract

High-quality care for children with medical complexity (CMC) is in its infancy. Residents have the opportunity to view care for CMC with a fresh perspective that is informed by their work across diverse health care settings and significant time spent at the bedside. This study aimed to identify the challenges and potential solutions for complex care delivery and education from their perspectives.We conducted three 60-minute focus groups with a purposeful sample of residents and recent graduates at a US tertiary-care medical center. Data were transcribed verbatim, and themes were identified using an iterative approach and modified grounded theory.Sixteen participants identified 4 major challenges to caring for CMC: 1) lack of care coordination; 2) complex technology management; 3) patients' pervasive psychosocial needs; and 4) lack of effective health care provider training. Participants identified 3 solutions: 1) greater integration of primary care providers; 2) attention to psychosocial needs through shared decision making; and 3) integration of longitudinal patient relationships into provider training. We found that residents who experienced longitudinal relationships with CMC felt more efficacious and better equipped to handle challenges of caring for CMC as a result of their broader understanding of patients' priorities and of their role as providers.Residents recognize important challenges and offer thoughtful solutions to caring for CMC. Although multiple solutions exist, formal integration of longitudinal patient experiences into residency training may better prepare residents to understand patient priorities and identify when their own attitudinal changes can guide them into more efficacious roles as providers.

View details for DOI 10.1016/j.acap.2015.08.004

View details for PubMedID 26409304

Outcomes of a Randomized Controlled Educational Intervention to Train Pediatric Residents on Caring for Children With Special Health Care Needs CLINICAL PEDIATRICS Bogetz, J. F., Gabhart, J. M., Rassbach, C. E., Sanders, L. M., Mendoza, F. S., Bergman, D. A., Blankenburg, R. L. 2015; 54 (7): 659-666

Abstract

Objective. To evaluate an innovative curriculum meeting new pediatric residency education guidelines, Special Care Optimization for Patients and Education (SCOPE). Methods. Residents were randomized to intervention (n = 23) or control (n = 25) groups. Intervention residents participated in SCOPE, pairing them with a child with special health care needs (CSHCN) and faculty mentor to make a home visit, complete care coordination toolkits, and participate in case discussions. The primary outcome was resident self-efficacy in nine skills in caring for CSHCN. Secondary outcomes included curriculum feasibility/acceptance, resident attitudes, and family satisfaction. Results. Response rates were 65%. Intervention residents improved in their self-efficacy for setting patient-centered goals compared with controls (mean change on 4-point Likert-type scale, 1.36 vs 0.56, P < .05). SCOPE was feasible/acceptable, residents had improved attitudes toward CSHCN, and families reported high satisfaction. Conclusion. SCOPE may serve as a model for efforts to increase residents' self-efficacy in their care of patients with chronic disease.

View details for DOI 10.1177/0009922814564050

View details for Web of Science ID 000354656600008

View details for PubMedID 25561698

Questioning as a teaching tool. Pediatrics Long, M., Blankenburg, R., Butani, L. 2015; 135 (3): 406-408

Abstract

The Dreyfus and Bloom frameworks can help the great clinical teacher craft questions that are learner-centric and appropriately challenging.Employing strategies to ask the right questions in the right way can further add to the effectiveness of using questions as a valuable teaching,learning, and assessment tool.

View details for DOI 10.1542/peds.2014-3285

View details for PubMedID 25647682

Continuing education needs of pediatricians across diverse specialties caring for children with medical complexity. Clinical pediatrics Bogetz, J. F., Bogetz, A. L., Gabhart, J. M., Bergman, D. A., Blankenburg, R. L., Rassbach, C. E. 2015; 54 (3): 222-227

Abstract

Objective. Care for children with medical complexity (CMC) relies on pediatricians who often are ill equipped, but striving to provide high quality care. We performed a needs assessment of pediatricians across diverse subspecialties at a tertiary academic US children's hospital about their continuing education needs regarding the care of CMC. Methods. Eighteen pediatricians from diverse subspecialties were asked to complete an online anonymous open-ended survey. Data were analyzed using modified grounded theory. Results. The response rate was 89% (n = 16). Of participants, 31.2% (n = 5) were general pediatricians, 18.7% (n = 3) were hospitalists, and 50% (n = 8) were pediatric subspecialists. Pediatricians recognized the need for skills in care coordination, giving bad news, working in interprofessional teams, and setting goals of care with patients. Conclusions. Practicing pediatricians need skills to improve care for CMC. Strategically incorporating basic palliative care education may fill an important training need across diverse pediatric specialties.

View details for DOI 10.1177/0009922814564049

View details for PubMedID 25561699

Changes in Medical Errors after Implementation of a Handoff Program NEW ENGLAND JOURNAL OF MEDICINE Starmer, A. J., Spector, N. D., Srivastava, R., West, D. C., Rosenbluth, G., Allen, A. D., NOBLE, E. L., Tse, L. L., Dalal, A. K., Keohane, C. A., Lipsitz, S. R., Rothschild, J. M., Wien, M. F., Yoon, C. S., Zigmont, K. R., Wilson, K. M., O'Toole, J. K., Solan, L. G., Aylor, M., Bismilla, Z., Coffey, M., Mahant, S., Blankenburg, R. L., Destino, L. A., EVERHART, J. L., Patel, S. J., Bale, J. F., Spackman, J. B., Stevenson, A. T., Calaman, S., Cole, F. S., Balmer, D. F., Hepps, J. H., Lopreiato, J. O., Yu, C. E., Sectish, T. C., Landrigan, C. P. 2014; 371 (19): 1803-1812
Challenges and Potential Solutions to Educating Learners About Pediatric Complex Care ACADEMIC PEDIATRICS Bogetz, J. F., Bogetz, A. L., Bergman, D., Turner, T., Blankenburg, R., Ballantine, A. 2014; 14 (6): 603-609
The prevalence of social and behavioral topics and related educational opportunities during attending rounds. Academic medicine Satterfield, J. M., Bereknyei, S., Hilton, J. F., Bogetz, A. L., Blankenburg, R., Buckelew, S. M., Chen, H. C., Monash, B., Ramos, J. S., Rennke, S., Braddock, C. H. 2014; 89 (11): 1548-1557

Abstract

To quantify the prevalence of social and behavioral sciences (SBS) topics during patient care and to rate team response to these topics once introduced.This cross-sectional study used five independent raters to observe 80 inpatient ward teams on internal medicine and pediatric services during attending rounds at two academic hospitals over a five-month period. Patient-level primary outcomes-prevalence of SBS topic discussions and rate of positive responses to discussions-were captured using an observational tool and summarized at the team level using hierarchical models. Teams were scored on patient- and learner-centered behaviors.Observations were made of 80 attendings, 83 residents, 75 interns, 78 medical students, and 113 allied health providers. Teams saw a median of 8.0 patients per round (collectively, 622 patients), and 97.1% had at least one SBS topic arise (mean = 5.3 topics per patient). Common topics were pain (62%), nutrition (53%), social support (52%), and resources (39%). After adjusting for team characteristics, the number of discussion topics raised varied significantly among the four services and was associated with greater patient-centeredness. When topics were raised, 38% of teams' responses were positive. Services varied with respect to learner- and patient-centeredness, with most services above average for learner-centered, and below average for patient-centered behaviors.Of 30 SBS topics tracked, some were addressed commonly and others rarely. Multivariable analyses suggest that medium-sized teams can address SBS concerns by increasing time per patient and consistently adopting patient-centered behaviors.

View details for DOI 10.1097/ACM.0000000000000483

View details for PubMedID 25250747

Stimulating Reflective Practice Among Your Learners PEDIATRICS Butani, L., Blankenburg, R., Long, M. 2013; 131 (2): 204-206

View details for DOI 10.1542/peds.2012-3106

View details for Web of Science ID 000314355100044

View details for PubMedID 23339227