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Katherine Hill, MD

Specialties

Adolescent Medicine

Work and Education

Professional Education

Stanford University Registrar, Stanford, CA, 6/15/2013

Residency

Stanford University Pediatric Residency, Palo Alto, CA, 6/30/2016

Board Certifications

Pediatrics, American Board of Pediatrics

All Publications

EFFECTS OF PARTICIPATION IN AN INPATIENT REPRODUCTIVE HEALTH CONSULT SERVICE ON PEDIATRIC RESIDENTS' COMPETENCE IN PROVIDING REPRODUCTIVE CARE FOR ADOLESCENTS AND YOUNG ADULTS Hill, K., Goldstein, R. ELSEVIER SCIENCE INC. 2019: S86
Eating behavior and reasons for exercise among competitive collegiate male athletes. Eating and weight disorders : EWD Gorrell, S., Nagata, J. M., Hill, K. B., Carlson, J. L., Shain, A. F., Wilson, J., Alix Timko, C., Hardy, K. K., Lock, J., Peebles, R. 2019

Abstract

Research concerning eating disorders among adolescent and young adult male athletes is limited compared with female counterparts, but increasing evidence indicates that they may be at unique risk for unhealthy exercise and eating behavior. The current study aimed to characterize unhealthy exercise and eating behavior according to competitive athlete status, as well as per sport type.Collegiate male athletes (N=611), each affiliated with one of the 10 National College Athletics Association (NCAA) Division I schools in the United States, completed an online survey, reporting on eating and extreme weight control behaviors, and reasons for exercise.Competitive athletes endorsed increased driven exercise and exercising when sick. Baseball players, cyclists, and wrestlers emerged as the sports with the most players reporting elevated Eating Disorder Examination-Questionnaire scores in a clinical range, and basketball players reported the highest rates of binge eating. overall, baseball players, cyclists, rowers, and wrestlers appeared to demonstrate the greatest vulnerability for unhealthy eating and exercise behavior.Findings revealed differences between competitive and non-competitive male athletes. Among competitive athletes, results identified unique risk for unhealthy eating and exercise behavior across a variety of sport categories and support continued examination of these attitudes and behaviors in a nuanced manner.Evidence obtained from well-designed controlled trials without randomization.

View details for DOI 10.1007/s40519-019-00819-0

View details for PubMedID 31782028

The Eating Disorder Examination Questionnaire (EDE-Q) among university men and women at different levels of athleticism. Eating behaviors Darcy, A. M., Hardy, K. K., Lock, J., Hill, K. B., Peebles, R. 2013; 14 (3): 378-381

Abstract

The aim of the current study was to establish norms for the Eating Disorder (ED) Examination Questionnaire (EDE-Q) among competitive athletes and to explore the contribution of level of athletic involvement and gender to ED psychopathology, as measured by the EDE-Q. University students (n=1637) from ten United States universities were recruited online via a social networking website and asked to complete an anonymous survey. The sample was then divided according to gender and level of sports participation. Females scored higher than males regardless of level of athleticism. Lower mean scores were frequently observed among those involved in competitive sports exclusively and highest scores among those involved in recreational sports (alone or in addition to competitive athletics). Recreational activity seems to be important in stratifying risk among competitive athletes; gender is an important interaction term in athletic populations.

View details for DOI 10.1016/j.eatbeh.2013.04.002

View details for PubMedID 23910784