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Kari Berquist, PhD

  • Kari L Berquist

Especialidades

Psychology

Trabajo y Educación

Internado

Claremont Graduate University, Claremont, CA, 2009

Compañerismo

Stanford University - CAPS, Stanford, CA, 2011

Certificaciones Médicas

Psychology, Behavior Analyst Certification Board

Condiciones Tratadas

Autism

Todo Publicaciones

Effects of a parent-implemented Developmental Reciprocity Treatment Program for children with autism spectrum disorder. Autism : the international journal of research and practice Gengoux, G. W., Schapp, S., Burton, S., Ardel, C. M., Libove, R. A., Baldi, G., Berquist, K. L., Phillips, J. M., Hardan, A. Y. 2018: 1362361318775538

Abstract

Developmental approaches to autism treatment aim to establish strong interpersonal relationships through joint play. These approaches have emerging empirical support; however, there is a need for further research documenting the procedures and demonstrating their effectiveness. This pilot study evaluated changes in parent behavior and child autism symptoms following a 12-week Developmental Reciprocity Treatment parent-training program. A total of 22 children with autism spectrum disorder between 2 and 6years (mean age=44.6months, standard deviation=12.7) and a primary caregiver participated in 12 weekly sessions of Developmental Reciprocity Treatment parent training, covering topics including introduction to developmental approaches, supporting attention and motivation, sensory regulation and sensory-social routines, imitation/building nonverbal communication, functional language development, and turn taking. Results indicated improvement in aspects of parent empowerment and social quality of life. Improvement in core autism symptoms was observed on the Social Responsiveness Scale total score (F(1,19): 5.550, p=0.029), MacArthur-Bates Communicative Development Inventories number of words produced out of 680 (F(1,18): 18.104, p=0.000), and two subscales of the Repetitive Behavior Scale, Revised (compulsive, p=0.046 and restricted, p=0.025). No differences in sensory sensitivity were observed on the Short Sensory Profile. Findings from this pilot study indicate that Developmental Reciprocity Treatment shows promise and suggest the need for future controlled trials of this developmentally based intervention.

View details for DOI 10.1177/1362361318775538

View details for PubMedID 29775078

Pivotal Response Treatment Parent Training for Autism: Findings from a 3-Month Follow-Up Evaluation JOURNAL OF AUTISM AND DEVELOPMENTAL DISORDERS Gengoux, G. W., Berquist, K. L., Salzman, E., Schapp, S., Phillips, J. M., Frazier, T. W., Minjarez, M. B., Hardan, A. Y. 2015; 45 (9): 2889-2898

Abstract

This study's objective was to assess maintenance of treatment effects 3months after completion of a 12-week Pivotal Response Treatment (PRT) parent education group. Families who completed the active treatment (N=23) were followed for an additional 12weeks to measure changes in language and cognitive skills. Results indicated a significant improvement in frequency of functional utterances, with maintenance at 3-month follow-up [F(2, 21): 5.9, p=.009]. Children also made significant gains on the Vineland Communication Domain Standard Score [F(2, 12):11.74, p=.001] and the Mullen Scales of Early Learning Composite score [F(1, 20)=5.43, p=.03]. These results suggest that a brief PRT parent group intervention can lead to improvements in language and cognitive functioning that are maintained 12weeks post treatment.

View details for DOI 10.1007/s10803-015-2452-3

View details for Web of Science ID 000360545800018

Pivotal Response Treatment Parent Training for Autism: Findings from a 3-Month Follow-Up Evaluation. Journal of autism and developmental disorders Gengoux, G. W., Berquist, K. L., Salzman, E., Schapp, S., Phillips, J. M., Frazier, T. W., Minjarez, M. B., Hardan, A. Y. 2015; 45 (9): 2889-2898

Abstract

This study's objective was to assess maintenance of treatment effects 3months after completion of a 12-week Pivotal Response Treatment (PRT) parent education group. Families who completed the active treatment (N=23) were followed for an additional 12weeks to measure changes in language and cognitive skills. Results indicated a significant improvement in frequency of functional utterances, with maintenance at 3-month follow-up [F(2, 21): 5.9, p=.009]. Children also made significant gains on the Vineland Communication Domain Standard Score [F(2, 12):11.74, p=.001] and the Mullen Scales of Early Learning Composite score [F(1, 20)=5.43, p=.03]. These results suggest that a brief PRT parent group intervention can lead to improvements in language and cognitive functioning that are maintained 12weeks post treatment.

View details for DOI 10.1007/s10803-015-2452-3

View details for PubMedID 25911977

A randomized controlled trial of Pivotal Response Treatment Group for parents of children with autism. Journal of child psychology and psychiatry, and allied disciplines Hardan, A. Y., Gengoux, G. W., Berquist, K. L., Libove, R. A., Ardel, C. M., Phillips, J., Frazier, T. W., Minjarez, M. B. 2015; 56 (8): 884-892

Abstract

With rates of autism diagnosis continuing to rise, there is an urgent need for effective and efficient service delivery models. Pivotal Response Treatment (PRT) is considered an established treatment for autism spectrum disorder (ASD); however, there have been few well-controlled studies with adequate sample size. The aim of this study was to conduct a randomized controlled trial to evaluate PRT parent training group (PRTG) for targeting language deficits in young children with ASD.Fifty-three children with autism and significant language delay between 2 and 6years old were randomized to PRTG (N=27) or psychoeducation group (PEG; N=26) for 12weeks. The PRTG taught parents behavioral techniques to facilitate language development. The PEG taught general information about ASD (clinical trial NCT01881750; http://www.clinicaltrials.gov).Analysis of child utterances during the structured laboratory observation (primary outcome) indicated that, compared with children in the PEG, children in the PRTG demonstrated greater improvement in frequency of utterances (F(2, 43)=3.53, p=.038, d=0.42). Results indicated that parents were able to learn PRT in a group format, as the majority of parents in the PRTG (84%) met fidelity of implementation criteria after 12weeks. Children also demonstrated greater improvement in adaptive communication skills (Vineland-II) following PRTG and baseline Mullen visual reception scores predicted treatment response to PRTG.This is the first randomized controlled trial of group-delivered PRT and one of the largest experimental investigations of the PRT model to date. The findings suggest that specific instruction in PRT results in greater skill acquisition for both parents and children, especially in functional and adaptive communication skills. Further research in PRT is warranted to replicate the observed results and address other core ASD symptoms.

View details for DOI 10.1111/jcpp.12354

View details for PubMedID 25346345

Teaching Parents of Children with Autism to Evaluate Interventions JOURNAL OF DEVELOPMENTAL AND PHYSICAL DISABILITIES Berquist, K. L., Charlop, M. H. 2014; 26 (4): 451-472