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Janell Sherr, MD

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Especialidades médicas y/o especialidades quirúrgicas

Allergy & Immunology

Trabajo y educación

Educación

University of Maryland Baltimore, Baltimore, MD 21201, 5/18/2007

Primeros años de residencia

University of Maryland Medical Center, Baltimore, MD, 6/30/2008

Últimos años de residencia

University of Maryland Medical Center, Baltimore, MD, 11/30/2011

Subespecialidad

Stanford University Allergy and Immunology Fellowship, Stanford, CA, 6/30/2015

Certificado(s) de especialidad

Allergy & Immunology, American Board of Allergy & Immunology

Internal Medicine, American Board of Internal Medicine

Pediatrics, American Board of Pediatrics

Todo Publicaciones

Allergic Diseases and Immune-Mediated Food Disorders in Pediatric Acute-Onset Neuropsychiatric Syndrome PEDIATRIC ALLERGY IMMUNOLOGY AND PULMONOLOGY Rosa, J. S., Hernandez, J. D., Sherr, J. A., Smith, B. M., Brown, K. D., Farhadian, B., Mahony, T., McGhee, S. A., Lewis, D. B., Thienemann, M., Frankovich, J. D. 2018; 31 (3): 15865
Anaphylaxis to invasive chlorhexidine administration despite tolerance of topical chlorhexidine use JOURNAL OF ALLERGY AND CLINICAL IMMUNOLOGY-IN PRACTICE Postolova, A., Bradley, J. T., Parris, D., Sherr, J., McGhee, S. A., Hernandez, J. D. 2018; 6 (3): 1067-+

View details for PubMedID 29226805

Allergic Diseases and Immune-Mediated Food Disorders in Pediatric Acute-Onset Neuropsychiatric Syndrome. Pediatric allergy, immunology, and pulmonology Rosa, J. S., Hernandez, J. D., Sherr, J. A., Smith, B. M., Brown, K. D., Farhadian, B., Mahony, T., McGhee, S. A., Lewis, D. B., Thienemann, M., Frankovich, J. D. 2018; 31 (3): 15865

Abstract

Background: The prevalence and impact of allergic and immune-mediated food disorders in pediatric acute-onset neuropsychiatric syndrome (PANS) are mostly unknown. Objective: We sought to explore the prevalence of atopic dermatitis (AD), asthma, allergic rhinitis (AR), IgE-mediated food allergies (FAs), and other immune-mediated food disorders requiring food avoidance in patients with PANS. In addition, to further understand the extent of food restriction in this population, we investigated the empiric use of dietary measures to improve PANS symptoms. Methods: Pediatric patients in a PANS Clinic and Research Program were given surveys regarding their caregiver burdens, allergic and food-related medical history, and whether food elimination resulted in perception of improvement of PANS symptoms. A review of health records was conducted to confirm that all responses in the survey were concordant with documentation of each patient's medical chart. Results: Sixty-nine (ages 4-20 years) of 80 subjects who fulfilled PANS criteria completed the surveys. Thirteen (18.8%) had AD, 11 (15.9%) asthma, 33 (47.8%) AR, 11 (15.9%) FA, 1 (1.4%) eosinophilic gastrointestinal disorders, 1 (1.4%) food protein-induced enterocolitis syndrome, 3 (4.3%) milk protein-induced proctocolitis syndrome, and 3 (4.3%) celiac disease. Thirty subjects (43.5%) avoided foods due to PANS; elimination of gluten and dairy was most common and was associated with perceived improvement of PANS symptoms (by parents). This perceived improvement was not confirmed with objective data. Conclusions: The prevalence of allergic and immune-mediated food disorders in PANS is similar to the general population as reported in the literature, with the exception of AR that appears to be more prevalent in our PANS cohort. More research will be required to establish whether diet or allergies influence PANS symptoms.

View details for PubMedID 30283713

Improvement of psychiatric symptoms in youth following resolution of sinusitis INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF PEDIATRIC OTORHINOLARYNGOLOGY Mahony, T., Sidell, D., Gans, H., Brown, K., Farhadian, B., Gustafson, M., Sherr, J., Thienemann, M., Frankovich, J. 2017; 92: 38-44

Abstract

Accumulating evidence supports a role for inflammation in psychiatric illness, and the onset or exacerbation of psychiatric symptoms may follow non-CNS infections. Here, we provide the first detailed description of obsessive-compulsive and related psychiatric symptoms arising concurrently with sinusitis.We reviewed the charts of 150 consecutive patients evaluated in our Pediatric Acute-onset Neuropsychiatric Syndromes clinic for documented sinusitis as defined by the American Academy of Pediatrics guidelines. Sinusitis treatments, sinonasal imaging, and neuropsychiatric symptoms before, during, and after sinusitis onset were noted. Patients were included in the final review if they had a clear diagnosis of isolated sinusitis (without concurrent illness and/or immunodeficiency), and were evaluated during an episode of sinusitis.10/150 (6.6%) patients had isolated sinusitis at the time of their neuropsychiatric deterioration. Eight patients received antibiotics to treat sinusitis, three of whom also received sinus surgery. Neuropsychiatric symptoms improved in all eight patients concurrent with resolution of sinusitis per parent report and clinician assessment. One patient did not follow through with recommended sinus surgery or antibiotics and her psychiatric symptoms persisted. One patient was lost to follow-up.Improvement of psychiatric symptoms correlated with resolution of sinus disease in this retrospective study. Identification, treatment, and resolution of underlying infections, including sinusitis, may have the potential to change the trajectory of some neuropsychiatric illnesses. Randomized clinical trials are needed.

View details for DOI 10.1016/j.ijporl.2016.10.034

View details for Web of Science ID 000393245100008

View details for PubMedID 28012531