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Jessica Moriarty, MD

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Especialidades médicas y/o especialidades quirúrgicas

Hospice & Palliative Medicine

Trabajo y educación

Educación

St Louis University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO, 5/17/2015

Últimos años de residencia

Stanford Health Care at Lucile Packard Children's Hospital, Palo Alto, CA, 06/30/2019

Subespecialidad

Stanford Pediatric Hospital Medicine Fellowship, Palo Alto, CA, 06/30/2021

Washington University in St. Louis Palliative Medicine Fellowship, St. Louis, MO, 06/30/2022

Certificado(s) de especialidad

Pediatrics, American Board of Pediatrics

Todo Publicaciones

Righting the Autonomy-Supervision Pendulum: Understanding the Impact of Independent Rounds on Medical Students, Residents, and Faculty. Academic medicine : journal of the Association of American Medical Colleges Moriarty, J. A., Vellanki, S. n., Trope, L. A., Hilgenberg, S. L., Blankenburg, R. L. 2020

Abstract

To explore trainee and faculty perspectives on an independent rounding intervention on general pediatrics wards at 2 institutions.In July 2018, the authors introduced independent rounds 1 to 2 times a week at 2 training sites. In this qualitative study, the authors conducted semi-structured focus groups with a purposive sample of junior trainees (clerkship medical students and PGY1 residents), senior trainees (PGY2 and PGY3-5 residents), and hospital medicine faculty between October 2018 and May 2019. Focus groups were audio-recorded, transcribed verbatim, and analyzed for themes using the constant comparative approach associated with grounded theory.Focus groups included 27 junior trainees, 20 senior trainees, and 18 faculty. Six themes emerged: (1) Independent rounds contributed to all trainees' development; (2) Senior residents described increased motivation to take full ownership of their patients and educational needs of the team; (3) Faculty expressed concerns about decreased opportunities for teaching and feedback, however all trainees reported unique learning from having faculty both present and absent from rounds; (4) No significant patient safety events were reported; (5) All participants identified communication and patient progression concerns; (6) A tension emerged between decreased faculty and enhanced trainee career satisfaction. Participants identified solutions to identified barriers to further improve this educational intervention.As a result of independent rounding, trainees described increased motivation to take ownership of their patients and team. Both rounding experiences contributed to their development as physicians in different ways. Further studies should explore patient and caregiver perspectives and concerns about communication and patient care progression when designing future interventions to promote resident autonomy.

View details for DOI 10.1097/ACM.0000000000003645

View details for PubMedID 32769470