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Shannon Beres, MD

  • “I have a lot of energy, which I funnel into being an advocate for each family I see.”

My mother was a special education teacher, so I grew up with a model of helping others. In high school I worked with children with disabilities and was a mentor for them, which inspired me to become a doctor.

I chose child neurology because I was interested in helping children with special needs, and was inspired by the family dynamics created when there's a child that has special needs.

Diseases that involve the brain can be very alarming to a family, but with additional teaching and describing how the brain works I help families understand their child's condition. I take a family-centered approach to care and believe in making decisions and developing a management plan together as a team.

I have a lot of energy, which I funnel into being an advocate for each family I see. I spend a lot of extra time going the extra mile, whether that's further diagnostic workup or making sure their care plan is fully executed. I am here for each family every step of the way.

Especialidades médicas y/o especialidades quirúrgicas

Ophthalmology

Neurology - Child Neurology

Trabajo y educación

Educación

Virginia Commonwealth University School of Medicine Registrar, Richmond, VA, 6/15/2009

Primeros años de residencia

UCSF Pediatric Residency, San Francisco, CA, 8/28/2011

Últimos años de residencia

UCSF Child Neurology Residency, San Francisco, CA, 8/31/2014

Subespecialidad

University of Pennsylvania Ophthalmology Fellowships, Philadelphia, PA, 7/31/2015

Certificado(s) de especialidad

Neurology - Child Neurology, American Board of Psychiatry and Neurology

Experiencia

3rd 4th 6th Nerve Palsies

Brain Trauma

Brain Tumors

Cancer-Related Optic Nerve Swelling

Epilepsy Surgery

Eye Movement Abnormalities

Idiopathic Intracranial Hypertension

Myasthenia Gravis

Nystagmus

Optic Disc Atrophy

Optic Nerve Abnormalities

Optic Neuritis

Optic Neuropathy

Optic Pathway Gliomas

Papilledema

Pseudotumor Cerebri Syndrome

Septo-Optic Dysplasia

Stroke

Visual Field Defects

Todo Publicaciones

Video Teaching NeuroImages: Atypical abnormal eye movements in PNPO-related Epilepsy. Neurology Pavitt, S., Karamian, A. G., Chattree, G., Klotz, J., Beres, S. 2020

View details for DOI 10.1212/WNL.0000000000010861

View details for PubMedID 32913027

Cryopyrin-Associated Periodic Syndrome in Neuro-Ophthalmology. Journal of neuro-ophthalmology : the official journal of the North American Neuro-Ophthalmology Society Harish Bindiganavile, S., Beres, S., Bhat, N., Lee, A. G. 2020

View details for DOI 10.1097/WNO.0000000000001080

View details for PubMedID 32868579

The Cause of Spasmus Nutans and Congenital Nystagmus: Frozen in Time JOURNAL OF PEDIATRICS Beres, S. 2020; 223: 169-+
50 Years Ago in The Journal of Pediatrics: The Cause of Spasmus Nutans and Congenital Nystagmus: Frozen in Time. The Journal of pediatrics Beres, S. 2020; 223: 169

View details for DOI 10.1016/j.jpeds.2020.02.042

View details for PubMedID 32711744

A Tearfully Painful Darkness. Survey of ophthalmology Leishangthem, L., Beres, S., Moss, H. E., Chen, J. 2020

Abstract

A 70-year-old woman presented with new onset of left eye and facial pain. Ophthalmic and neurological examinations, MRI brain, ESR and CRP were unrevealing. A few days later she developed vision loss in her left eye. Exam revealed decreased visual acuity with a relative afferent pupillary defect in the left eye, and a diffuse mild swelling of the left optic nerve head. Repeat MRI showed T2 hyperintensity and enhancement of the intraorbital optic nerve and surrounding tissues with no other intracranial abnormalities. Serum studies showed elevated myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG) IgG titer. She was treated with IV methylprednisolone 1000mg daily for 3 days and was discharged on prolonged prednisone taper with return of vision to baseline.

View details for DOI 10.1016/j.survophthal.2020.06.002

View details for PubMedID 32540257

Update in Pediatric Pseudotumor Cerebri Syndrome. Seminars in neurology Beres, S. J. 2020

Abstract

Pseudotumor cerebri syndrome (PTCS) is a rare condition in children presenting with headache and papilledema from increased intracranial pressure that can cause significant morbidity. This can be idiopathic, also known as idiopathic intracranial hypertension or primary intracranial hypertension, or can be secondary to medications and associated medical conditions. Given the threat to vision, early detection and treatment is needed in all age groups. However, identifying papilledema or pseudopapilledema in children presents unique challenges sometimes as a result of differences between prepubertal and postpubertal children, further elucidating the complex pathophysiology. Management requires brain imaging, lumbar puncture, and frequent eye exams with medical and rarely surgical treatment. Visual outcomes in children are favorable if caught early and management can be prolonged over years. Pediatric PTCS is different from adult PTCS in many ways, and this review will focus on the most updated definitions of the disease, theories of pathophysiology, management, and treatment in the pediatric population.

View details for DOI 10.1055/s-0040-1708847

View details for PubMedID 32422670

Atypical abnormal eye movements in PNPO-related epilepsy Pavitt, S., Karamian, A., Chattree, G., Klotz, J., Beres, S. LIPPINCOTT WILLIAMS & WILKINS. 2020
Steroid-sparing maintenance immunotherapy for MOG-IgG associated disorder. Neurology Chen, J. J., Flanagan, E. P., Bhatti, M. T., Jitprapaikulsan, J., Dubey, D., Lopez Chiriboga, A. S., Fryer, J. P., Weinshenker, B. G., McKeon, A., Tillema, J. M., Lennon, V. A., Lucchinetti, C. F., Kunchok, A., McClelland, C. M., Lee, M. S., Bennett, J. L., Pelak, V. S., Van Stavern, G., Adesina, O. O., Eggenberger, E. R., Acierno, M. D., Wingerchuk, D. M., Lam, B. L., Moss, H., Beres, S., Gilbert, A. L., Shah, V., Armstrong, G., Heidary, G., Cestari, D. M., Stiebel-Kalish, H., Pittock, S. J. 2020

Abstract

Myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein-immunoglobulin G (MOG-IgG) associated disorder (MOGAD) often manifests with recurrent CNS demyelinating attacks. The optimal treatment for reducing relapses is unknown. To help determine the efficacy of long-term immunotherapy in preventing relapse in patients with MOGAD, we conducted a multicenter retrospective study to determine the rate of relapses on various treatments.We determined the frequency of relapses in patients receiving various forms of long-term immunotherapy for MOGAD. Inclusion criteria were history of 1 CNS demyelinating attacks, MOG-IgG seropositivity, and immunotherapy for 6 months. Patients were reviewed for CNS demyelinating attacks before and during long-term immunotherapy.Seventy patients were included. The median age at initial CNS demyelinating attack was 29 years (range 3-61 years; 33% <18 years), and 59% were female. The median annualized relapse rate (ARR) before treatment was 1.6. On maintenance immunotherapy, the proportion of patients with relapse was as follows: mycophenolate mofetil 74% (14 of 19; ARR 0.67), rituximab 61% (22 of 36; ARR 0.59), azathioprine 59% (13 of 22; ARR 0.2), and IV immunoglobulin (IVIG) 20% (2 of 10; ARR 0). The overall median ARR on these 4 treatments was 0.3. All 9 patients treated with multiple sclerosis (MS) disease-modifying agents had a breakthrough relapse on treatment (ARR 1.5).This large retrospective multicenter study of patients with MOGAD suggests that maintenance immunotherapy reduces recurrent CNS demyelinating attacks, with the lowest ARR being associated with maintenance IVIG therapy. Traditional MS disease-modifying agents appear to be ineffective. Prospective randomized controlled studies are required to validate these conclusions.

View details for DOI 10.1212/WNL.0000000000009758

View details for PubMedID 32554760

Anatomic and Thermometric Analysis of Cranial Nerve Palsy after Laser Amygdalohippocampotomy for Mesial Temporal Lobe Epilepsy. Operative neurosurgery (Hagerstown, Md.) Huang, Y., Leung, S. A., Parker, J. J., Ho, A. L., Wintermark, M., Patel, S. H., Pauly, K. B., Kakusa, B. W., Beres, S. J., Henderson, J. M., Grant, G. A., Halpern, C. H. 2019

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Laser interstitial thermal therapy (LITT) is a minimally invasive therapy for treating medication-resistant mesial temporal lobe epilepsy. Cranial nerve (CN) palsy has been reported as a procedural complication, but the mechanism of this complication is not understood.OBJECTIVE: To identify the cause of postoperative CN palsy after LITT.METHODS: Four medial temporal lobe epilepsy patients with CN palsy after LITT were identified for comparison with 22 consecutive patients with no palsy. We evaluated individual variation in the distance between CN III and the uncus, and CN IV and the parahippocampal gyrus using preoperative T1- and T2-weighted magnetic resonance (MR) images. Intraoperative MR thermometry was used to estimate temperature changes.RESULTS: CN III (n=2) and CN IV palsies (n=2) were reported. On preoperative imaging, the majority of identified CN III (54%) and CN IV (43%) were located within 1 to 2 mm of the uncus and parahippocampal gyrus tissue border, respectively. Affected CN III and CN IV were more likely to be found<1 mm of the tissue border (PCNIII=.03, PCNIV<.01; chi-squared test). Retrospective assessment of thermal profile during ablation showed higher temperature rise along the mesial temporal lobe tissue border in affected CNs than unaffected CNs after controlling for distance (12.9C vs 5.8C; P=.03; 2-sample t-test).CONCLUSION: CN palsy after LITT likely results from direct heating of the respective CN running at extreme proximity to the mesial temporal lobe. Low-temperature thresholds set at the border of the mesial temporal lobe in patients whose CNs are at close proximity may reduce this risk.

View details for DOI 10.1093/ons/opz279

View details for PubMedID 31555820

Unilateral retinitis pigmentosa in children JOURNAL OF AAPOS Mercado, C. L., Pham, B. H., Beres, S., Marmor, M. F., Lambert, S. R. 2018; 22 (6): 45761
Pseudotumor Cerebri Syndrome is the Best Term for This Condition PEDIATRIC NEUROLOGY Beres, S. J., Digre, K. B., Friedman, D. I., Liu, G. T. 2018; 87: 910
Pseudotumor Cerebri Syndrome is the Best Term for This Condition. Pediatric neurology Beres, S. J., Digre, K. B., Friedman, D. I., Liu, G. T. 2018; 87: 910

View details for PubMedID 30501891

Unilateral retinitis pigmentosa in children. Journal of AAPOS : the official publication of the American Association for Pediatric Ophthalmology and Strabismus Mercado, C. L., Pham, B. H., Beres, S., Marmor, M. F., Lambert, S. R. 2018

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is a group of rare inherited retinal disorders characterized by diffuse progressive degeneration of the retina that typically presents bilaterally. Unilateral RP has not often been reported in children. We present a series of cases that illustrate discrimination between unilateral and asymmetric disease and between dystrophy and acquired degeneration.METHODS: Four patients (9-15 years of age; 3 females) were referred to our institution for possible unilateral RP based on fundus appearance and unilateral symptoms. All underwent full-field electroretinography (ERG), spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT), widefield and color fundus photography, and fundus autofluorescence (FAF) imaging. Genetic testing and a vitamin and essential fatty acids panel were also conducted in 1 patient.RESULTS: Unilateral retinal degeneration was confirmed in 2 patients, whose fellow eyes showed no abnormalities on ERG or imaging. The other 2 patients were found to have highly asymmetric retinal degeneration based on ERG, wide-angle images, and repeated examinations (range, 0.3-9.8 years). Genetic testing and blood testing in 1 unilateral case were negative.CONCLUSIONS: Childhood-onset "unilateral RP" remains a difficult and uncertain diagnosis. ERG testing and longitudinal and widefield fundus examination are necessary to exclude asymmetrical disease. Although unilateral degeneration may exist in some children, its inherited or acquired etiology remains poorly understood.

View details for PubMedID 30243749

Optic Pathway Gliomas Secondary to Neurofibromatosis Type 1 SEMINARS IN PEDIATRIC NEUROLOGY Beres, S., Avery, R. A. 2017; 24 (2): 9299

Abstract

Children with neurofibromatosis type 1 frequently manifest optic pathway gliomas-low-grade gliomas intrinsic to the visual pathway. This review describes the molecular and genetic mechanisms driving optic pathway gliomas as well as the clinical symptoms of this relatively common genetic condition. Recommendations for clinical management and descriptions of the newest imaging techniques are discussed.

View details for PubMedID 28941532

Pediatric Pseudotumor Cerebri Syndrome: Diagnosis, Classification, and Underlying Pathophysiology SEMINARS IN PEDIATRIC NEUROLOGY Sheldon, C. A., Paley, G. L., Beres, S. J., McCormack, S. E., Liu, G. T. 2017; 24 (2): 11015

Abstract

Pseudotumor cerebri syndrome (PTCS) is defined by the presence of elevated intracranial pressure in the setting of normal brain parenchyma and cerebrospinal fluid. PTCS can occur in the pediatric and adult populations and, if untreated, may lead to permanent visual loss. In this review, discussion will focus on PTCS in the pediatric population and will outline its distinct epidemiology and key elements of diagnosis, evaluation and management. Finally, although the precise mechanisms are unclear, the underlying pathophysiology will be considered.

View details for PubMedID 28941525

Optic Pathway Gliomas JOURNAL OF PEDIATRIC NEUROLOGY Beres, S., Avery, R. A. 2017; 15 (1): 1524