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Derek Chu, MD

  • Derek Hanson Chu
  • “To me, there is no greater joy than making a positive difference in a child's life.”

My experience volunteering at an orphanage during high school inspired me to become a doctor. I knew then that I wanted to support children by improving their health. To me, there is no greater joy than making a positive difference in a child's life.

The skin can be a window into a child's well-being. As a pediatric dermatologist, I decipher patterns and clues on children's skin to make diagnoses and to uncover any underlying medical conditions.

My approach to providing care is to involve families as much as possible in the process. We work together as a team. I take the time to ensure everyone fully understands the decisions we've made. My goal is to always do what is best for the child and family, and I want families to know that I'm here to help in any way I can.

Especialidades médicas y/o especialidades quirúrgicas

Dermatology

Trabajo y educación

Educación

Perelman School of Medicine University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA, 5/16/2011

Primeros años de residencia

Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, PA, 06/20/2012

Últimos años de residencia

University of Pennsylvania Health System, Philadelphia, PA, 6/30/2015

Subespecialidad

UCSF Dept of Dermatology, San Francisco, CA, 6/30/2016

Certificado(s) de especialidad

Dermatology, American Board of Dermatology

Pediatric Dermatology, American Board of Dermatology

Servicios

Dermatología

Todo Publicaciones

Characteristics of melanoma in white and nonwhite children, adolescents, and young adults: Analysis of a pediatric melanoma institutional registry, 1995-2018 PEDIATRIC DERMATOLOGY Afanasiev, O. K., Tu, J. H., Chu, D. H., Swetter, S. M. 2019; 36 (4): 44854

View details for DOI 10.1111/pde.13836

View details for Web of Science ID 000474933900017

Characteristics of melanoma in white and nonwhite children, adolescents, and young adults: Analysis of a pediatric melanoma institutional registry, 1995-2018. Pediatric dermatology Afanasiev, O. K., Tu, J. H., Chu, D. H., Swetter, S. M. 2019

Abstract

OBJECTIVES: To characterize clinical differences among nonwhite/multiethnic vs white children, adolescents, and young adults with melanoma or atypical melanocytic neoplasms, including atypical Spitz tumors.PATIENTS AND METHODS: A cohort of 55 patients (< 25years of age) prospectively followed from 1995 to 2018 in the Stanford Pigmented Lesion and Melanoma Program was analyzed for differences in clinical presentation, including skin phototype, race/ethnicity, age, sex, tumor/melanoma characteristics, and outcome.RESULTS: Seventeen patients (9 males and 8 females) were classified as nonwhite (predominantly skin phototype IV) and of Hispanic, Asian, or Black/African American ethnicity, and 38 patients (21 males and 17 females) were classified as white (predominantly phototypes I/II). Ages ranged from 6months to 24years, and median follow-up was 36months (range 1-180months). Melanomas were diagnosed in 87% of whites in our cohort, compared to 65% of nonwhites, with the remainder representing mainly atypical Spitz tumors. Lesions were usually brought to the attention of a health care provider by the patient or family (P<0.05). Compared with whites, nonwhites were more likely to present at a younger mean age (10.9years vs 15.4years, P<0.05) and with pink/clinically amelanotic tumors (59% vs 24%, P=0.02).CONCLUSIONS: This long-term prospective institutional study showed clinically relevant differences between nonwhite vs white children, adolescents, and young adults diagnosed with melanoma and atypical melanocytic neoplasms. Nonwhite patients presented at a younger age and had more clinically amelanotic melanocytic tumors. Increased recognition of clinical factors and risk of these tumors in nonwhites could result in earlier diagnosis.

View details for PubMedID 30993772