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Ellen Wang, MD

  • Ellen Ya-Ping Wang

Specialties

Anesthesia

Work and Education

Professional Education

University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, 2003

Internship

Alameda County Medical Center, Oakland, CA, 2004

Residency

UCLA, Los Angeles, CA, 2007

Fellowship

Children's Hospital Boston, Boston, MA, 2008

Stanford University Anesthesiology Residency, Stanford, CA, 06/30/2012

Board Certifications

Anesthesia, American Board of Anesthesiology

Clinical Informatics, American Board of Preventive Medicine

Pediatric Anesthesia, American Board of Anesthesiology

All Publications

Association Between Race and Ethnicity with Intraoperative Analgesic Administration and Initial Recovery Room Pain Scores in Pediatric Patients: a Single-Center Study of 21,229 Surgeries. Journal of racial and ethnic health disparities Jette, C. G., Rosenbloom, J. M., Wang, E., De Souza, E., Anderson, T. A. 2020

Abstract

INTRODUCTION: Perioperative pain may have deleterious effects for all patients. We aim to examine disparities in pain management for children in the perioperative period to understand whether any racial and ethnic groups are at increased risk of poor pain control.METHODS: Medical records from children 18years of age who underwent surgery from May 2014 to May 2018 were reviewed. The primary outcome was total intraoperative morphine equivalents. The secondary outcomes were intraoperative non-opioid analgesic administration and first conscious pain score. The exposure was race and ethnicity. The associations of race and ethnicity with outcomes of interest were modeled using linear or logistic regression, adjusted for preselected confounders and covariates. Bonferroni corrections were made for multiple comparisons.RESULTS: A total of 21,229 anesthetics were included in analyses. In the adjusted analysis, no racial and ethnic group received significantly more or less opioids intraoperatively than non-Hispanic (NH) whites. Asians, Hispanics, and Pacific Islanders were estimated to have significantly lower odds of receiving non-opioid analgesics than NH whites: odds ratio (OR)=0.83 (95% confidence interval (CI): 0.70, 0.97); OR=0.84 (95% CI: 0.74, 0.97), and OR=0.53 (95% CI: 0.33, 0.84) respectively. Asians were estimated to have significantly lower odds of reporting moderate-to-severe pain on awakening than NH whites: OR=0.80 (95% CI: 0.66, 0.99).CONCLUSIONS: Although children of all races and ethnicities investigated received similar total intraoperative opioid doses, some were less likely to receive non-opioid analgesics intraoperatively. Asians were less likely to report moderate-severe pain upon awakening. Further investigation may delineate how these differences lead to disparate patient outcomes and are influenced by patient, provider, and system factors.

View details for DOI 10.1007/s40615-020-00811-w

View details for PubMedID 32621098

A Retrospective Cohort Study of Predictors and Interventionsthat Influence Cooperation with Mask Induction in Children. Paediatric anaesthesia Marquez, J. L., Wang, E., Rodriguez, S. T., O'Connell, C., Munshey, F., Darling, C., Tsui, B., Caruso, J., Caruso, T. J. 2020

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Uncooperative pediatric mask induction is linked to perioperative anxiety. Although some risk factors for uncooperative inductions have been reported, there are no large cohort studies that identify intrinsic patient characteristics associated with cooperation.AIM: The primary aim was to identify patient characteristics associated with cooperative mask inductions. The secondary aim was to determine whether preoperative interventions were associated with increased cooperation.METHODS: This retrospective cohort study included patients 2 -11 years old and ASA class I-IV who underwent mask induction. Our primary outcome of interest was cooperation with mask induction, which was correlated against the Induction Compliance Checklist. The variables analyzed for association with cooperation were age, sex, ASA class, class of surgery, preferred language, and race. Interventions examined for association with induction cooperation included premedication with midazolam, exposure to distraction technology, parental presence, and the presence of a Child Life Specialist. Multivariate mixed effects logistic regression was used to assess the relationship between patient characteristics and cooperation. A separate multivariate mixed effects logistic regression was used to examine the association between preoperative interventions and cooperation.RESULTS: 9,692 patients underwent 23,474 procedures during the study period. 3,372 patients undergoing 5,980 procedures met inclusion criteria. The only patient characteristic associated with increased cooperation was age (OR 1.20, p-value 0.03). Involvement of Child Life Specialists was associated with increased cooperation (OR 4.44, p-value = 0.048) while parental/guardian presence was associated with decreased cooperation (OR 0.38, p-value = 0.002).CONCLUSION: In this cohort, increasing age was the only patient characteristic found to be associated with increased cooperation with mask induction. Preoperative intervention by a Child Life Specialists was the sole intervention associated with improved cooperation.

View details for DOI 10.1111/pan.13930

View details for PubMedID 32452092

A Quality Improvement Project to Reduce Combination Acetaminophen-opioid Prescriptions to Pediatric Orthopedic Patients. Pediatric quality & safety Caruso, T. J., Trivedi, S., Chadwick, W., Gaskari, S., Wang, E., Marquez, J., Lagasse, S., Bailey, M., Shea, K. 2020; 5 (3): e291

Abstract

Background: Acetaminophen-opioid analgesics are among the most commonly prescribed pain medications in pediatric orthopedic patients. However, these combined opioid analgesics do not allow for individual medication titration, which can increase the risk of opioid misuse and hepatoxicity from acetaminophen. The primary aim of this quality improvement project was to alter the prescribing habits of pediatric orthopedic providers at our institution from postoperative acetaminophen-opioid analgesics to independent acetaminophen and opioids.Methods: The study took place in a level 1 trauma center at a children's hospital. A multidisciplinary team of health professionals utilized lean methodology to develop a project plan. Guided by a key driver diagram, we removed acetaminophen-oxycodone products from hospital formulary, implemented a revised inpatient and outpatient electronic order set, and conducted multiple education efforts. Outcomes included inpatient and outpatient percent combined acetaminophen-opioid orders by surgical providers over 27 months.Results: Before the intervention, inpatient acetaminophen-opioid products accounted for an average of 46% of all opioid prescriptions for orthopedic patients. After the intervention and multiple educational efforts, we reported a reduction in the acetaminophen-opioid products to 2.9%. For outpatient prescriptions, combined analgesics accounted for 88% before the intervention, and we reported a reduction to 15% after the intervention.Conclusions: By removing acetaminophen-oxycodone products from hospital formulary, educating the medical staff, and employing revised electronic order sets, the prescribing practice of pediatric orthopedic surgeons changed from the routine use of acetaminophen-opioid analgesics to independent medications.

View details for DOI 10.1097/pq9.0000000000000291

View details for PubMedID 32607456

Retrospective Review of the Safety and Efficacy of Virtual Reality in a Pediatric Hospital. Pediatric quality & safety Caruso, T. J., O'Connell, C., Qian, J. J., Kung, T., Wang, E., Kinnebrew, S., Pearson, M., Kist, M., Menendez, M., Rodriguez, S. T. 2020; 5 (2): e293

Abstract

Introduction: Virtual reality (VR) is an emerging tool for anxiety and fear reduction in pediatric patients. VR use is facilitated by Certified Child Life Specialists (CCLS) at pediatric hospitals. The primary aim of this study was to retrospectively review the safety of VR by analyzing adverse events after the utilization of VR under CCLS supervision. Secondary objectives were to characterize the efficacy of VR in enhancing patient cooperation, describe the integration of VR into Child Life services, and identify interventions that accompanied VR.Methods: The Stanford Chariot Program developed VR applications, customized VR interfaces, and patient head straps, and distributed these to CCLS. Chart review analyzed VR utilization through CCLS patient notes. Inclusion criteria were all patients ages 6 to 18-years-old who received a Child Life intervention.Results: From June 2017 to July 2018, 31 CCLS saw 8,098 patients, 3,696 of which met age criteria with pre- and post-intervention cooperation data. Two hundred thirteen patients received VR with an accompanying intervention, while 34 patients received only VR. Adverse events were rare, and included increased anxiety (3.8%, n=8), dizziness (0.5%, n=1), and nausea (0.5%, n=1). Patients were more likely to be cooperative after receiving VR (99.5%, n=212) compared to pre-intervention (96.7%, n=206, p=0.041). VR use was most common in the perioperative setting (60%, n=128), followed by outpatient clinics (15%, n=32).Conclusion: VR is safe in pediatric patients with appropriate hardware, software, and patient selection. Side effects were rare and self-limited. VR appears to be associated with improvements in cooperation.

View details for DOI 10.1097/pq9.0000000000000293

View details for PubMedID 32426648

Mobilization and calibration of the HTC VIVE for virtual reality physical therapy. Digital health Hemphill, S., Nguyen, A., Rodriguez, S. T., Menendez, M., Wang, E., Lawrence, K., Caruso, T. J. 2020; 6: 2055207620950929

Abstract

Aims: The HTC VIVE virtual reality (VR) system is a potential tool for collecting kinematic data during inpatient and outpatient physical therapy (PT). When validated against research-grade systems, the VIVE has a reported translational error between 1.7mm-2.0cm. Our purpose was to portabilize the VIVE for room to room PT and validate the motion tracking software.Methods: The VIVE was configured on a mobile cart. To validate the motion tracking software, the VIVE sensors (motion tracker, controller, headset) were mounted on a rigid linear track and driven through 10, one-meter translations in the X, Y, and Z axes.Results: The mean translational error for all three sensors was below 4.9cm. While error is greater than that reported for research-grade systems, motion tracking software on the portable VIVE unit appears to be a valid means of tracking aggregate movement.Conclusion: Some therapy may require more precise measurements, however, the advantages of portability and accessibility to patients may outweigh the limitation of reduced precision.

View details for DOI 10.1177/2055207620950929

View details for PubMedID 32963801

State of the art in clinical decision support applications in pediatric perioperative medicine. Current opinion in anaesthesiology Wang, E., Brenn, B. R., Matava, C. T. 2020

Abstract

The goal of this review is to describe the recent improvements in clinical decision tools applied to the increasingly large and complex datasets in the pediatric ambulatory and inpatient setting.Clinical decision support has evolved beyond simple static alerts to complex dynamic alerts for: diagnosis, medical decision-making, monitoring of physiological, laboratory, and pharmacologic inputs, and adherence to institutional and national guidelines for both the patient and the healthcare team. Artificial intelligence and machine learning have enabled advances in predicting outcomes, such as sepsis and early deterioration, and assisting in procedural technique.With more than a decade of electronic medical data generation, clinical decision support tools have begun to evolve into more sophisticated and complex algorithms capable of transforming large datasets into succinct, timely, and pertinent summaries for treatment and management of pediatric patients. Future developments will need to leverage patient-generated health data, integrated device data, and provider-entered data to complete the continuum of patient care and will likely demonstrate improvements in patient outcomes.

View details for DOI 10.1097/ACO.0000000000000850

View details for PubMedID 32324659

Incidence of and Factors Associated With Prolonged and Persistent Postoperative Opioid Use in Children 0-18 Years of Age. Anesthesia and analgesia Ward, A., De Souza, E., Miller, D., Wang, E., Sun, E. C., Bambos, N., Anderson, T. A. 2020; 131 (4): 123748

Abstract

Long-term opioid use has negative health care consequences. Opioid-nave adults are at risk for prolonged and persistent opioid use after surgery. While these outcomes have been examined in some adolescent and teenage populations, little is known about the risk of prolonged and persistent postoperative opioid use after common surgeries compared to children who do not undergo surgery and factors associated with these issues among pediatric surgical patients of all ages.Using a national administrative claims database, we identified 175,878 surgical visits by opioid-nave children aged 18 years who underwent 1 of the 20 most common surgeries from each of 4 age groups between December 31, 2002, and December 30, 2017, and who filled a perioperative opioid prescription 30 days before to 14 days after surgery. Prolonged opioid use after surgery (filling 1 opioid prescription 90-180 days after surgery) was compared to a reference sample of 1,354,909 nonsurgical patients randomly assigned a false "surgery" date. Multivariable logistic regression models were used to estimate the association of surgical procedures and 22 other variables of interest with prolonged opioid use and persistent postoperative opioid use (filling 60 days' supply of opioids 90-365 days after surgery) for each age group.Prolonged opioid use after surgery occurred in 0.77%, 0.76%, 1.00%, and 3.80% of surgical patients ages 0-<2, 2-<6, 6-<12, and 12-18, respectively. It was significantly more common in surgical patients than in nonsurgical patients (ages 0-<2: odds ratio [OR] = 4.6 [95% confidence interval (CI), 3.7-5.6]; ages 2-<6: OR = 2.5 [95% CI, 2.1-2.8]; ages 6-<12: OR = 2.1 [95% CI, 1.9-2.4]; and ages 12-18: OR = 1.8 [95% CI, 1.7-1.9]). In the multivariable models for ages 0-<12 years, few surgical procedures and none of the other variables of interest were associated with prolonged opioid use. In the models for ages 12-18 years, 10 surgical procedures and 5 other variables of interest were associated with prolonged opioid use. Persistent postoperative opioid use occurred in <0.1% of patients in all age groups.Some patient characteristics and surgeries are positively and negatively associated with prolonged opioid use in opioid-nave children of all ages, but persistent opioid use is rare. Specific pediatric subpopulations (eg, older patients with a history of mood/personality disorder or chronic pain) may be at markedly higher risk.

View details for DOI 10.1213/ANE.0000000000004823

View details for PubMedID 32925345

Introduction of the EMR-integrated I-PASS ICU Handoff Tool. Pediatric quality & safety Caruso, T. J., Su, F., Wang, E. 2020; 5 (4): e334

View details for DOI 10.1097/pq9.0000000000000334

View details for PubMedID 32766505

View details for PubMedCentralID PMC7382550

Using Augmented Reality to Reduce Fear and Promote Cooperation During Pediatric Otolaryngologic Procedures. The Laryngoscope Caruso, T. J., Madill, M., Sidell, D., Meister, K., Wang, E., Menendez, M., Kist, M. N., Rodriguez, S. 2020

Abstract

This case series examines interactive AR during minor otolaryngologic procedures. Although VR has been successfully used for pediatric vascular access, removing children from comforting people in the real world has resulted in patient anxiety. AR offers a potential advantage, utilizing distracting holographic images when patients maintain eye contact with parents. The primary objective was to determine the effect of AR on fear during pediatric otolaryngologic procedures. Secondary objectives included evaluating pain; procedure compliance; and patient, parent and physician attitudes toward AR, as well as assessing the feasibility of adding AR to a busy outpatient otolaryngologic clinic. Laryngoscope, 2020.

View details for DOI 10.1002/lary.29098

View details for PubMedID 32886794

A Pilot Quality Improvement Project to Reduce Preoperative Fasting Duration in Pediatric Inpatients. Pediatric quality & safety Nye, A., Conner, E., Wang, E., Chadwick, W., Marquez, J., Caruso, T. J. 2019; 4 (6): e246

Abstract

Despite guidelines allowing clear liquids up to 2 hours before anesthesia, preoperative fasting for pediatric inpatients is often unnecessarily prolonged. This delay can lead to prolonged recovery time and increased postoperative pain. Efforts to reduce fasting duration in pediatric surgical patients is an evolving standard in pediatric anesthesiology. The primary aim of this quality improvement project was to reduce the average inpatient fasting duration undergoing anesthesia by 25% within a year of our pilot intervention. Secondary aims included measuring the adoption rate of the intervention and comparing aspiration rates as a balancing measure.Methods: At an academic pediatric hospital, we created the preanesthesia diet order, a standardized, clear liquid diet for eligible inpatients undergoing anesthesia to decrease preoperative fasting duration. After implementation in January 2018, a statistical process control chart was used to measure the fasting duration of all eligible inpatients by month, and the Wilcoxon rank-sum test assessed differences. A Poisson test was used to determine differences in aspiration rates.Results: Over the first year of our pilot intervention, 127 inpatients received the preanesthesia diet. The average fasting duration before its implementation was 12.5 and 5.7 hours postimplementation. The average adoption rate for eligible inpatients was 17.6%, and there was no difference in aspiration rates.Conclusion: This quality improvement project demonstrated that a standardized, clear liquid diet on the morning of surgery could reduce preoperative fasting times among pediatric inpatients. The adoption of this pilot intervention was limited, highlighting the challenges of implementing a practice change.

View details for DOI 10.1097/pq9.0000000000000246

View details for PubMedID 32010870

A multifaceted quality improvement project improves intraoperative redosing of surgical antimicrobial prophylaxis during pediatric surgery PEDIATRIC ANESTHESIA Colletti, A. A., Wang, E., Marquez, J. L., Schwenk, H. T., Yeverino, C., Sharek, P. J., Caruso, T. J. 2019; 29 (7): 70511

View details for DOI 10.1111/pan.13651

View details for Web of Science ID 000478990900006

Differential Lung Ventilation Using a Bronchial Blocker in a Pediatric Patient on Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation: A Case Report. A&A practice Bhargava, V., Arastu, A., Darling, C., Wang, E., Kache, S. 2019

Abstract

We describe a patient with acute on chronic respiratory failure after a cardiac arrest who was cannulated to venoarterial extracorporeal membrane oxygenation. The patient developed right-sided interstitial emphysema with air leak and left-sided hemothorax with secondary atelectasis. A differential lung ventilation strategy was used in which an endotracheal tube was placed in the left main stem bronchus and a bronchial blocker was placed in the right mainstem bronchus. The patient's overall pulmonary function improved, and he was successfully decannulated from extracorporeal membrane oxygenation. In conclusion, differential lung ventilation may be performed in patients on extracorporeal membrane oxygenation with disparate lung disease as an alternative ventilation strategy.

View details for DOI 10.1213/XAA.0000000000001025

View details for PubMedID 31162224

Association Between Race and Ethnicity in the Delivery of Regional Anesthesia for Pediatric Patients: A Single-Center Study of 3189 Regional Anesthetics in 25,664 Surgeries. Anesthesia and analgesia King, M. R., De Souza, E., Rosenbloom, J. M., Wang, E., Anderson, T. A. 2019

Abstract

Racial and ethnic disparities in health care are well documented in the United States, although evidence of disparities in pediatric anesthesia is limited. We sought to determine whether there is an association between race and ethnicity and the use of intraoperative regional anesthesia at a single academic children's hospital.We performed a retrospective review of all anesthetics at an academic tertiary children's hospital between May 4, 2014, and May 31, 2018. The primary outcome was delivery of regional anesthesia, defined as a neuraxial or peripheral nerve block. The association between patient race and ethnicity (white non-Hispanic or minority) and receipt of regional anesthesia was assessed using multivariable logistic regression. Sensitivity analyses were performed comparing white non-Hispanic to an expansion of the single minority group to individual racial and ethnic groups and on patients undergoing surgeries most likely to receive regional anesthesia (orthopedic and urology patients).Of 33,713 patient cases eligible for inclusion, 25,664 met criteria for analysis. Three-thousand one-hundred eighty-nine patients (12.4%) received regional anesthesia. One thousand eighty-six of 8884 (13.3%) white non-Hispanic patients and 2003 of 16,780 (11.9%) minority patients received regional anesthesia. After multivariable adjustment for confounding, race and ethnicity were not found to be significantly associated with receiving intraoperative regional anesthesia (adjusted odds ratios [ORs] = 0.95; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.86-1.06; P = .36). Sensitivity analyses did not find significant differences between the white non-Hispanic group and individual races and ethnicities, nor did they find significant differences when analyzing only orthopedic and urology patients, despite observing some meaningful clinical differences.In an analysis of patients undergoing surgical anesthesia at a single academic children's hospital, race and ethnicity were not significantly associated with the adjusted ORs of receiving intraoperative regional anesthesia. This finding contrasts with much of the existing health care disparities literature and warrants further study with additional datasets to understand the mechanisms involved.

View details for DOI 10.1213/ANE.0000000000004456

View details for PubMedID 31569162

Anesthesiologist Surgery Assignments Using Policy Learning Ward, A., Zhou, Z., Bambos, N., Scheinker, D., Wang, E., IEEE IEEE. 2019
Programmed Intermittent Bolus Regimen for Erector Spinae Plane Blocks in Children: A Retrospective Review of a Single-Institution Experience. Anesthesia and analgesia Munshey, F., Caruso, T. J., Wang, E. Y., Tsui, B. C. 2018

Abstract

With few published reports on erector spinae plane block use in children, limited guidance on perioperative local anesthetic dosing exists. We present a series of 22 patients who received erector spinae plane catheters with programmed intermittent bolus for various surgeries. Median loading dose of 0.4 mL/kg (interquartile range [IQR], 0.1 mL/kg) ropivacaine 0.5%, intraoperative bolus of 0.3 mL/kg/h (IQR, 0.1 mL/kg) ropivacaine 0.2%, and a postoperative programmed intermittent bolus regimen of maximum 0.6 mg/kg/h resulted in highest pain scores on postoperative day 1 with a median score of 1.7 of 10 (IQR, 1.8) and highest morphine equivalents consumed on postoperative day 2 with a median score of 0.16 mg/kg up to 120 hours after surgery.

View details for DOI 10.1213/ANE.0000000000003817

View details for PubMedID 30252704

A Retrospective Review of a Bed-mounted Projection System for Managing Pediatric Preoperative Anxiety. Pediatric quality & safety Caruso, T. J., Tsui, J. H., Wang, E., Scheinker, D., Sharek, P. J., Cunningham, C., Rodriguez, S. T. 2018; 3 (4): e087

Abstract

Introduction: Most children undergoing anesthesia experience significant preoperative anxiety. We developed a bedside entertainment and relaxation theater (BERT) as an alternative to midazolam for appropriate patients undergoing anesthesia. The primary aim of this study was to determine if BERT was as effective as midazolam in producing cooperative patients at anesthesia induction. Secondary aims reviewed patient emotion and timeliness of BERT utilization.Methods: We conducted a retrospective cohort study of pediatric patients undergoing anesthesia at Lucile Packard Children's Hospital Stanford between February 1, 2016, and October 1, 2016. Logistic regression compared induction cooperation between groups. Multinomial logistic regression compared patients' emotion at induction. Ordinary least squares regression compared preoperative time.Results: Of the 686 eligible patients, 163 were in the BERT group and 150 in the midazolam. Ninety-three percentage of study patients (290/313) were cooperative at induction, and the BERT group were less likely to be cooperative (P = 0.04). The BERT group was more likely to be "playful" compared with "sedated" (P < 0.001). There was a reduction of 14.7 minutes in preoperative patient readiness associated with BERT (P = 0.001).Conclusions: Although most patients were cooperative for induction in both groups, the midazolam group was more cooperative. The BERT reduced the preinduction time and was associated with an increase in patients feeling "playful."

View details for PubMedID 30229198

A RETROSPECTIVE COHORT STUDY OF PREDICTORS AND INTERVENTIONS THAT INFLUENCE COOPERATION WITH PEDIATRIC ANESTHESIA MASK INDUCTION Caruso, T., O'Connell, C., Wang, E., Rodriguez, S., Darling, C., Caruso, J., Tsui, B. LIPPINCOTT WILLIAMS & WILKINS. 2018: 5023
THE INCIDENCE OF DESATURATION DURING MICROLARYNGOSCOPY AND BRONCHOSCOPY: A QUALITY CONTROL REVIEW Caruso, T., Tsui, B., Wang, E., Darling, C., Sidell, D. LIPPINCOTT WILLIAMS & WILKINS. 2018: 572
Intraoperative antibiotic redosing compliance and the extended postoperative recovery period: often overlooked areas that may reduce surgical site infections. Paediatric anaesthesia Caruso, T. J., Wang, E., Colletti, A. A., Sharek, P. J. 2018

Abstract

It was with great interest that we read Compliance with perioperative prophylaxis guidelines and the use of novel outcome measures by Morse, etal.1 The authors should be applauded for presenting a well-balanced review of the rationale behind the use of prophylactic antibiotics, data supporting dosing intervals, and potential outcome measures. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

View details for PubMedID 30592343

Enhancing pediatric airway safety using the electronic medical record. The Laryngoscope Rameau, A., Wang, E., Saraswathula, A., Pageler, N., Perales, S., Sidell, D. R. 2018

Abstract

Difficult intubations are not uncommon in tertiary care children's hospitals, and effective documentation of the difficult airway is a fundamental element of safe airway management. The primary goal of our quality improvement initiative was to improve access to airway information via an alert and documentation system within the electronic medical record (EMR).We created a difficult airway alert within the EMR, linking common airway evaluation templates used by specialists involved in airway management. We assessed the time required for different specialists to answer an airway information questionnaire using the electronic charts of patients before and after the EMR modification. Satisfaction with the EMR modification was also surveyed.Questionnaires were administered to 12 participants before the Epic (Epic Systems Corp., Verona, WI) changes were implemented and to 19 participants after they were implemented. Each participant was asked to answer the airway data questionnaire for two patients, for a total of 24 questionnaires before the EMR changes and 38 questionnaires after the changes. Respondents averaged 7.24 minutes to complete the entire airway data questionnaire before the EMR changes and 3.16 minutes following modification (P<0.0001). Correct airway information was more consistently collected with the modified EMR (98.6% vs 51.4%, P<0.00001). Satisfaction surveys revealed that participants found the accessibility of airway data to be significantly improved following the EMR changes.An EMR airway alert that provides rapid access to relevant airway information critical tool during urgent and emergent events. Based on our preliminary data, further use of this instrument is expected to continue to improve patient safety and practitioner satisfaction.4. Laryngoscope, 2018.

View details for PubMedID 30195274

A Postoperative Care Bundle Reduces Surgical Site Infections in Pediatric Patients Undergoing Cardiac Surgeries. Joint Commission journal on quality and patient safety Caruso, T. J., Wang, E. Y., Schwenk, H., Marquez, J. L., Cahn, J., Loh, L., Schaffer, J., Chen, K., Wood, M., Sharek, P. J. 2018

Abstract

Pediatric patients undergoing cardiac surgeries are at an increased surgical site infection (SSI) risk, given prolonged cardiopulmonary bypasses and delayed sternal closures. At one institution, the majority of cardiac patients developed SSIs during prolonged recoveries in the cardiovascular intensive care unit (CVICU). Although guidelines have been published to reduce SSIs in the perioperative period, there have been few guidelines to reduce the risk during prolonged hospital recoveries. The aim of this project was to study a postoperative SSI reduction care bundle, with a goal of reducing cardiac SSIs by 50%, from 3.4 to 1.7 per 100 procedures.This project was conducted at a quaternary, pediatric academic center with a 20-bed CVICU. Historical control data were recorded from January 2013 through May 2015 and intervention/sustainment data from June 2015 through March 2017. A multidisciplinary SSI reduction team developed five key drivers that led to implementation of 11 postoperative SSI reduction care elements. Statistical process control charts were used to measure process compliance, and Pearson's chi-square test was used to determine differences in SSI rates.Prior to implementation, there were 27 SSIs in 799 pediatric cardiac surgeries (3.4 SSIs per 100 surgeries). After the intervention, SSIs significantly decreased to 5 in 570 procedures (0.9 SSIs per 100 surgeries; p=0.0045).This project describes five key drivers and 11 elements that were dedicated to reducing the risk of SSI during prolonged CVICU recoveries from pediatric cardiac surgery, with demonstrated sustainability.

View details for DOI 10.1016/j.jcjq.2018.05.009

View details for PubMedID 30170753

A quality improvement initiative to optimize dosing of surgical antimicrobial prophylaxis. Paediatric anaesthesia Caruso, T. J., Wang, E., Schwenk, H. T., Scheinker, D., Yeverino, C., Tweedy, M., Maheru, M., Sharek, P. J. 2017; 27 (7): 702-710

Abstract

The risk of surgical site infections is reduced with appropriate timing and dosing of preoperative antimicrobials. Based on evolving national guidelines, we increased the preoperative dose of cefazolin from 25 to 30 mgkg(-1) . This quality improvement project describes an improvement initiative to develop standard work processes to ensure appropriate dosing.The primary aim was to deliver cefazolin 30 mgkg(-1) to at least 90% of indicated patients. The secondary aim was to determine differences between accuracy of cefazolin doses when given as an electronic order compared to a verbal order.Data were collected from January 1, 2012 to May 31, 2016. A quality improvement team of perioperative physicians, nurses, and pharmacists implemented a series of interventions including new electronic medical record order sets, personal provider antibiotic dose badges, and utilization of pharmacists to prepare antibiotics to increase compliance with the recommended dose. Process compliance was measured using a statistical process control chart, and dose compliance was measured through electronic analysis of the electronic medical record. Secondary aim data were displayed as percentage of dose compliance. An unpaired t-test was used to determine differences between groups.Between January 1, 2012 and May 31, 2016, cefazolin was administered to 9086 patients. The mean compliance of cefazolin at 30 mgkg(-1) from May 2013 to March 2014 was 40%, which prompted initiation of this project. From April 2014 to May 2016, a series of interventions were deployed. The mean compliance from September 2015 to May 2016 was 93% with significantly reduced variation and no special cause variation, indicating that the process was in control at the target primary aim. There were 649 cefazolin administrations given verbally and 1929 given with an electronic order between October 1, 2014 and May 31, 2016. During this time period, the rate of compliance of administering cefazolin at 30 mgkg(-1) was significantly higher when given after an electronic order than when given verbally, 94% vs 76%.This comprehensive quality improvement project improved practitioner compliance with evidence-based preoperative antimicrobial dosing recommendations to reduce the risk of surgical site infections.

View details for DOI 10.1111/pan.13137

View details for PubMedID 28321988

A Novel Bed-Mounted Projection System is as Effective as Pharmacologic Modalities to Treat Pediatric Preoperative Anxiety Caruso, T. J., Rodriguez, S., Wang, E., Terajewicz, A., Brockington, D., Cunningham, C., Sharek, P. J., Marquez, J. LIPPINCOTT WILLIAMS & WILKINS. 2017: 2325