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Jessica Gold, MD

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Work and Education

Professional Education

New York Medical College, Valhalla, NY, 5/26/2010

Internship

Montefiore Medical Center - Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY, 6/30/2011

Residency

Montefiore Medical Center - Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY, 6/30/2013

Board Certifications

Pediatrics, American Board of Pediatrics

All Publications

Impact of Discharge Components on Readmission Rates for Children Hospitalized with Asthma JOURNAL OF PEDIATRICS Parikh, K., Hall, M., Kenyon, C. C., Teufel, R. J., Mussman, G. M., Montalbano, A., Gold, J., Antoon, J. W., Subramony, A., Mittal, V., Morse, R. B., Wilson, K. M., Shah, S. S. 2018; 195: 175-+

Abstract

To describe hospital-based asthma-specific discharge components at children's hospitals and determine the association of these discharge components with pediatric asthma readmission rates.This is a multicenter retrospective cohort study of pediatric asthma hospitalizations in 2015 at children's hospitals participating in the Pediatric Health Information System. Children ages 5 to 17 years were included. An electronic survey assessing 13 asthma-specific discharge components was sent to quality leaders at all 49 hospitals. Correlations of combinations of asthma-specific discharge components and adjusted readmission rates were calculated.The survey response rate was 92% (45 of 49 hospitals). Thirty-day and 3-month adjusted readmission rates varied across hospitals, ranging from 1.9% to 3.9% for 30-day readmissions and 5.7% to 9.1% for 3-month readmissions. No individual or combination discharge components were associated with lower 30-day adjusted readmission rates. The only single-component significantly associated with a lower rate of readmission at 3 months was having comprehensive content of education (P<.029). Increasing intensity of discharge components in bundles was associated with reduced adjusted 3-month readmission rates, but this did not reach statistical significance. This was seen in a 2-discharge component bundle including content of education and communication with the primary medical doctor, as well as a 3-discharge component bundle, which included content of education, medications in-hand, and home-based environmental mitigation.Children's hospitals demonstrate a range of asthma-specific discharge components. Although we found no significant associations for specific hospital-level discharge components and asthma readmission rates at 30 days, certain combinations of discharge components may support hospitals to reduce healthcare utilization at 3 months.

View details for DOI 10.1016/j.jpeds.2017.11.062

View details for Web of Science ID 000428232400031

View details for PubMedID 29395170

Long length of hospital stay in children with medical complexity. Journal of hospital medicine Gold, J. M., Hall, M., Shah, S. S., Thomson, J., Subramony, A., Mahant, S., Mittal, V., Wilson, K. M., Morse, R., Mussman, G. M., Hametz, P., Montalbano, A., Parikh, K., Ishman, S., O'Neill, M., Berry, J. G. 2016; 11 (11): 750-756

Abstract

Hospitalizations of children with medical complexity (CMC) account for one-half of hospital days in children, with lengths of stays (LOS) that are typically longer than those for children without medical complexity. The objective was to assess the impact of, risk factors for, and variation across children's hospitals regarding long LOS (10 days) hospitalizations in CMC.A retrospective study of 954,018 CMC hospitalizations, excluding admissions for neonatal and cancer care, during 2013 to 2014 in 44 children's hospitals. CMC were identified using 3M's Clinical Risk Group categories 6, 7, and 9, representing children with multiple and/or catastrophic chronic conditions. Multivariable regression was used to identify demographic and clinical characteristics associated with LOS 10 days. Hospital-level risk-adjusted rates of long LOS generated from these models were compared using a covariance test of the hospitals' random effect.Among CMC, LOS 10 days accounted for 14.9% (n = 142,082) of all admissions and 61.8% ($13.7 billion) of hospital costs. The characteristics most strongly associated with LOS 10 days were use of intensive care unit (ICU) (odds ratio [OR]: 3.5, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 3.4-3.5), respiratory complex chronic condition (OR: 2.7, 95% CI: 2.6-2.7), and transfer from another medical facility (OR: 2.1, 95% CI: 2.0-2.1). After adjusting for severity, there was significant (P < 0.001) variation in the prevalence of LOS 10 days for CMC across children's hospitals (range, 10.3%-21.8%).Long hospitalizations for CMC are costly. Their prevalence varies significantly by type of chronic condition and across children's hospitals. Efforts to reduce hospital costs in CMC might benefit from a focus on prolonged LOS. Journal of Hospital Medicine 2016;11:750-756. 2016 Society of Hospital Medicine.

View details for DOI 10.1002/jhm.2633

View details for PubMedID 27378587

Comparative Effectiveness of Dexamethasone versus Prednisone in Children Hospitalized with Asthma JOURNAL OF PEDIATRICS Parikh, K., Hall, M., Mittal, V., Montalbano, A., Gold, J., Mahant, S., Wilson, K. M., Shah, S. S. 2015; 167 (3): 639-?

Abstract

To study the comparative effectiveness of dexamethasone vs prednisone/prednisolone in children hospitalized with asthma exacerbation not requiring intensive care.This multicenter retrospective cohort study, using the Pediatric Health Information System, included children aged 4-17 years who were hospitalized with a principal diagnosis of asthma between January 1, 2007 and December 31, 2012. Children with chronic complex condition and/or initial intensive care unit (ICU) management were excluded. Propensity score matching was used to detect differences in length of stay (LOS), readmissions, ICU transfer, and cost between groups.40,257 hospitalizations met inclusion criteria; 1166 (2.9%) received only dexamethasone. In the matched cohort (N = 1284 representing 34 hospitals), the LOS was significantly shorter in the dexamethasone group compared with the prednisone/prednisolone group. The proportion of subjects with a LOS of 3 days or more was 6.7% in the dexamethasone group and 12% in the prednisone/prednisolone group (P = .002). Differences in all-cause readmission at 7- and 30 days were not statistically significant. The dexamethasone group had lower costs of index admission ($2621 vs $2838; P < .001) and total episode of care (including readmissions) ($2624 vs $2856; P < .001) compared with the prednisone/prednisolone group. There were no clinical significant differences in ICU transfer or readmissions between groups.Dexamethasone may be considered an alternative to prednisone/prednisolone for children hospitalized with asthma exacerbation not requiring admission to intensive care.

View details for DOI 10.1016/j.jpeds.2015.06.038

View details for Web of Science ID 000363540200029

View details for PubMedID 26319919

Association of National Guidelines With Tonsillectomy Perioperative Care and Outcomes PEDIATRICS Mahant, S., Hall, M., Ishman, S. L., Morse, R., Mittal, V., Mussman, G. M., Gold, J., Montalbano, A., Srivastava, R., Wilson, K. M., Shah, S. S. 2015; 136 (1): 53-60

Abstract

To investigate the association of the 2011 American Academy of Otolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery guidelines with perioperative care processes and outcomes in children undergoing tonsillectomy.We conducted a retrospective cohort study of otherwise healthy children undergoing tonsillectomy between January 2009 and January 2013 at 29 US children's hospitals participating in the Pediatric Health Information System. We measured evidence-based processes suggested by the guidelines (perioperative dexamethasone and no antibiotic use) and outcomes (30-day tonsillectomy complication-related revisits). We analyzed rates aggregated over the preguideline and postguideline periods and then by month over time by using interrupted time series.Of 111,813 children who underwent tonsillectomy, 54,043 and 57,770 did so in the preguideline and postguideline periods, respectively. Dexamethasone use increased from 74.6% to 77.4% (P < .001) in the preguideline to postguideline period, as did its rate of change in use (percentage change per month, -0.02% to 0.29%; P < .001). Antibiotic use decreased from 34.7% to 21.8% (P < .001), as did its rate of change in use (percentage change per month, -0.17% to -0.56%; P < .001). Revisits for bleeding remained stable; however, total revisits to the hospital for tonsillectomy complications increased from 8.2% to 9.0% (P < .001) because of an increase in revisits for pain. Hospital-level results were similar.The guidelines were associated with some improvement in evidence-based perioperative care processes but no improvement in outcomes. Dexamethasone use increased slightly, and antibiotic use decreased substantially. Revisits for tonsillectomy-related complications increased modestly over time because of revisits for pain.

View details for DOI 10.1542/peds.2015-0127

View details for Web of Science ID 000357296000047

View details for PubMedID 26101361

Treatment of hypovitaminosis D in infants and toddlers JOURNAL OF CLINICAL ENDOCRINOLOGY & METABOLISM Gordon, C. M., Williams, A. L., Feldman, H. A., May, J., Sinclair, L., Vasquez, A., Cox, J. E. 2008; 93 (7): 2716-2721

Abstract

Hypovitaminosis D appears to be on the rise in young children, with implications for skeletal and overall health.The objective of the study was to compare the safety and efficacy of vitamin D2 daily, vitamin D2 weekly, and vitamin D3 daily, combined with supplemental calcium, in raising serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] and lowering PTH concentrations.This was a 6-wk randomized controlled trial.The study was conducted at an urban pediatric clinic in Boston.Forty otherwise healthy infants and toddlers with hypovitaminosis D [25(OH)D < 20 ng/ml] participated in the study.Participants were assigned to one of three regimens: 2,000 IU oral vitamin D2 daily, 50,000 IU vitamin D2 weekly, or 2,000 IU vitamin D3 daily. Each was also prescribed elemental calcium (50 mg/kg.d). Infants received treatment for 6 wk.Before and after treatment, serum measurements of 25(OH)D, PTH, calcium, and alkaline phosphatase were taken.All treatments approximately tripled the 25(OH)D concentration. Preplanned comparisons were nonsignificant: daily vitamin D2 vs. weekly vitamin D2 (12% difference in effect, P = 0.66) and daily D2 vs. daily D3 (7%, P = 0.82). The mean serum calcium change was small and similar in the three groups. There was no significant difference in PTH suppression.Short-term vitamin D2 2,000 IU daily, vitamin D2 50,000 IU weekly, or vitamin D3 2,000 IU daily yield equivalent outcomes in the treatment of hypovitaminosis D among young children. Therefore, pediatric providers can individualize the treatment regimen for a given patient to ensure compliance, given that no difference in efficacy or safety was noted among these three common treatment regimens.

View details for DOI 10.1210/jc.2007-2790

View details for Web of Science ID 000257513700045

View details for PubMedID 18413426